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  • All fields: wind
(51 results)



Display: 20

    • Chapter I - To America - Page 1

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    • CHAPTER 1 he coastline of England becarne a speck in the distance as Henry Lunt stood on the old plank deck of the ship, Argo, straining to get the last view of his homeland.' It was a bleak n day i January 1850. A cold brisk breeze filled the...
    • mcbooki009: Poem: His Last Ride

    • Beaver County, Utah--History
    • His Last Ride Into the path of the sinking sun O'er the far horizon's rim He's gone, a smile in his kindly eyes A song in the heart of him. Gone with the friends of his Yesterdays Where the souls of men ride free And the stars look down on a...
    • Page 101

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    • intended to take them out there and exchange them for sheep. We went by way of Bear Valley, down the Sevier River, then turned East up Grass Valley up to Koosharem. At this point, we have a very bad snowstorm, about eighteen inches deep." (Lehi...
    • Page 104

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    • iron to almost any amount could soon be manufactured. The machinery is of the best kind and works well and would do for a much larger fbmace than what is up. In haste, I am yours, Henry Lunt. The settlers harvested many loads of grass hay from the...
    • Page 104

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    • no travel by way of Pine Creek and Wildcat Canyon for weeks. The travel went down the canyon west of Milford - so I did not know what to do. My horses were worn out, and to make that big circle would delay me for days. I finally decided to try it...
    • Page 11

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    • dirt . . . which every man is said to eat in his lifetime. It filled our eyes too, and our ears, and our nostrils. It was in the food; it sprinkled the pancakes; it was in the syrup that we poured over them. Half suffocated were we by it, during...
    • Page 112

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    • ofthe mountains were blessed with an array of trained laborers. This was a vital factor in the success of the Mormons as color~izers.~ Experienced workers had been sent to southern Utah to help in the manufacture of iron, but they were encountering...
    • Page 12

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    • dangerous. No less dangerous was the task of removing the yokes fiom the impatient creatures and of the unloosing the chains. The romance of being out in the wilds was terribly chilled by an inclement sky. A few days of drizzling rain tried the...
    • Page 13

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    • plains was so well organized that many of the prior problems had been solved and some diarists described the trip as a rather enjoyable event. Henry Lunt's company reached the Great Salt ~ a k valley on e August 28, 1850." After traveling through a...
    • Page 131

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    • lose their lives, than not. They decided to get out while they could. They loaded a little of the already sawed lumber onto the outfits and started back. They stopped for the night in a grove of pines near the Upper Mammoth. By morning, the snow...
    • Page 137

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    • On Sunday, May 15, 1853, Henry counseled the settlers not to scatter out on the city lots, to strengthen the fort and make it secure, to lock the gates every night and to have their guns and ammunition on hand. He recommended that the brethren...
    • Page 169

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    • The Indians have not troubled us much--there were a few Pauvants here a week ago who had thieving propensities, but they have left and all is peace. We keep a good lookout for them. The military regulations are strict, and all seem determined to...

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