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  • All fields: wind
(51 results)



Display: 20

    • mcbooki009: Poem: His Last Ride

    • Beaver County, Utah--History
    • His Last Ride Into the path of the sinking sun O'er the far horizon's rim He's gone, a smile in his kindly eyes A song in the heart of him. Gone with the friends of his Yesterdays Where the souls of men ride free And the stars look down on a...
    • Page 229

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    • Dec. 16. 1920.. .Marshal Nelson asked permission to purchase bedding, stove pipe, and bucket for the City Jail. Jan. 7 . 1921.. .Resolutions passed by various civic and Council members to inforce the ordinance in regard to sanitation, the dog...
    • Page 495

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    • manufacture of iron. Drama, for which Cedar has now become nationally known, was a favorite interest and avocation of the townspeople from the earliest days. Amusements, recreations of various kinds, and celebrations of important events livened up...
    • Chapter I - To America - Page 1

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    • CHAPTER 1 he coastline of England becarne a speck in the distance as Henry Lunt stood on the old plank deck of the ship, Argo, straining to get the last view of his homeland.' It was a bleak n day i January 1850. A cold brisk breeze filled the...
    • Page 11

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    • dirt . . . which every man is said to eat in his lifetime. It filled our eyes too, and our ears, and our nostrils. It was in the food; it sprinkled the pancakes; it was in the syrup that we poured over them. Half suffocated were we by it, during...
    • Page 12

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    • dangerous. No less dangerous was the task of removing the yokes fiom the impatient creatures and of the unloosing the chains. The romance of being out in the wilds was terribly chilled by an inclement sky. A few days of drizzling rain tried the...
    • Page 13

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    • plains was so well organized that many of the prior problems had been solved and some diarists described the trip as a rather enjoyable event. Henry Lunt's company reached the Great Salt ~ a k valley on e August 28, 1850." After traveling through a...
    • Page 36

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    • creeks out of the canyons, widens to encompass an area of good farmland, then tapers off and disappears in the desert gorges and mesas that stretch westward. With the advent of spring, the snow banks melt and disappear, and the mountainsides become...
    • Page 40

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    • for a state road from Peteetneet to Iron Springs, one for an exploration to find a new route from Tooele County to this place via Sevier Lake, and one for a railroad from the Great Salt Lake City to Iron spring^.^ To avoid the wind which blew out...
    • Page 48

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    • th~s volunteer school was superseded by regularly scheduled classes." Smith wrote: "March 19, 1851: The wind blew very hard from the south leaving no tents standing in camp. March 20: Went with Frost and Bringhurst to visit the coal vein [Cedar...
    • Page 67

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    • The men of Cedar City spent Tuesday, November 25, making a wind break around each of the wagons out of cedar trees. James Whittaker, who had been visiting his family in Parowan, arrived back in the settlement that day with his daughter, Ellen. Many...
    • Page 71

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    • evening meeting where the congregation was addressed by Carruthers and Lunt, after which there was a testimony meeting. Several children spoke and one little boy said he was willing to do as his parents told h q and he also would do whatever...

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