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Display: 20

    • Page 3

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 3 Acknowledgements I would like to thank everyone who helped on this project. First of all, many thanks to Art Challis and Matt Barton for their help on the project. I appreciate their patience and support as I...
    • Page 6

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 6 emotion and dialogue to pitching to an agent, what a writer needs to know about self-publishing, designing a novel cover and how to write a great first page. Those people who teach these classes go through the...
    • Page 8

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 8 Suspense and Conflict: One of the most important themes is conflict and suspense. Conflict builds suspense. Tension and suspense are the same thing. Amy Deardon in her book, How to Develop Story Tension discusses...
    • Page 10

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 10 the writer made in the very first scene and how if that doesn’t happen then the writer will lose the reader who probably won’t buy another book from that writer. She talks about the ‘very last scene, last...
    • Page 11

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 11 to illustrate his points. He also uses movies that weren’t the success that the producers hoped for to illustrate what happens when ‘Saving the Cat’ isn’t used. The example he used were the two Laura Croft...
    • Page 16

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 16 Part Two: Presentation I have attended a number of writing conferences ranging from a one-day conference in Kanab, Utah that cost $40.00 to a week-long conference that cost well over a thousand dollars. In...
    • Page 20

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 20 Step 4: Additional information. This might not be necessary, but can be added if needed. Lesson 4 This lesson discusses the colors and fonts that work best for a PowerPoint Presentation. Color and text must have...
    • Page 22

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 22 Using the Beat Sheet or how to outline your novel effectively isn’t integral to the actual story. In other words, the reader won’t know if the writer is an outliner or a pantser. A pantser is a writer who just...
    • Page 25

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 25 your life. There were sections on maintaining balance between home, work, and writing if writing wasn’t yet a full time career. Classes could be taught on query letters and making a pitch to an agent, as well as...
    • Page 53

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 53 Appendix Three Your Suspense Toolbox Macro Suspense Suspense is what is going to happen next to your lead character and does it mean death to the hero. Each scene must end with suspense to keep the reader turning...
    • Page 30

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 26 participation in the development of self-assessment criteria, question cards, rubrics, and checklists. Students should be responding to their writing in a global way and evaluating specific aspects of their writing in order to improve both the...
    • Page 31

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 27 When students develop a sense of self-efficacy in their writing, they will be able to make a distinct connection between practice and ultimate writing achievement—if they work hard, they will achieve successful academic writing outcomes....
    • Page 33

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 29 language acquisition. As parents offer positive reinforcement during a child’s formative years, their children ultimately achieve language acquisition success. However, by the time students reach high school, they have had so many discouraging...
    • Page 34

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 30 students on how to review a peer’s paper, but who combine that instruction with handouts, role play, and modeling strategies will help students think below the surface of proofreading and realize that writing involves a much more involved...
    • Page 37

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 33 majority of students who have received their educational curriculum from a foreign country have simply not had the rigorous demands of writing instruction in any language; therefore, their writing deficiencies could have very little to do with...
    • Page 41

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 37 Chapter 3 Methodology Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study is to draw attention to the continuing problem of underprepared students for college-level writing expectations; to show that the writing gap between secondary and college...
    • Page 42

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 38 Participants Approximately two groups or a maximum total of 50 bilingual English/Spanish students will be selected to participate in this study for the purpose of analyzing their English writing abilities before and after the implementation of...
    • Page 50

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 46 who they are today; this assignment was more commonly referred to as the “Define Me” essay. Students were provided with a six-category, four-point rubric (see Appendix C) and were assessed based on Introduction, Sentence Structure, Word Choice,...

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