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    • Page 15

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    • 10 learning disabilities or those who just struggle in general. Many of these students also have difficulty understanding vocabulary as it relates to their world. Effective Instruction Finding the best programs and the most effective means of...
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    • 11 were significantly more satisfied with their school of choice when compared to a traditional public school parent, after five years, parental satisfaction in a charter school was only slightly different that parental satisfaction with a...
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    • 12 yearly progress. NCLB requires that ELLs be included in state yearly assessments for accountability purposes. Reasonable accommodations must be made for assessments administered to these students. Each state sets their own model for identifying...
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    • 13 When results are positive, the school and its stakeholders can claim an excellent academic program; however, when results are negative, they list the many reasons why high-stakes testing is a poor indicator of school success. In order to...
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    • 14 Gresham’s study illustrates that even students with significantly high levels of math anxiety can improve their attitudes toward math when the right treatment is utilized. Other treatments include a self-paced program (Gresham, 2007), graphic...
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    • 15 need to be developed so that they provide new ways to assess the non-cognitive skills that students need to succeed in college and in the workplace. Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) proposes that a growth-based evaluation be included into...
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    • 18 Such is the case in many states: plenty of information, but information that, more often than not, simply leads to more questions. Charter schools can play a key role in parent choice and satisfaction, but only if parents can clearly understand...
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    • 20 Third, focus activities are used to, again, maintain a routine and ensure students feel comfortable and know what is expected. Starting class on the right note is imperative. For example, if the instructor is not prepared to start class, it...
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    • 21 initially established with high correlations between CBM assessments and achievement tests such as the Peabody Individual Achievement Test and the Standford Achievement Test (Deno, 1985). Teachers can identify students who are in need of...
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    • 22 Each Monday, the students were given a vocabulary pretest to determine their knowledge of the words. The researcher noticed some students finished fairly quickly while others were still trying to figure out the first sentence. The researcher...
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    • 25 to create their own custom tests. These tests can be used to get a more in-depth understanding of each individual’s weaknesses on specific objectives. YPP reports provide details about the skills and concepts tested and include the corresponding...
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    • 26 Chapter 5 Discussion There will always be struggling readers of varying degrees and abilities. The 1974 court decision of Lau vs. Nichols forced action to be taken by all school districts in the United States, making sure that all students would...
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    • 29 6/28/14 I worked with one of our supervisors to adapt some of our hikes for guests that are less physically able. Most of our offerings are intermediate level with the strenuous incline that nature surrounds us with. We are working on creating...
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    • 3 Chapter 2 Literature Review The focus of this literature review was on adolescent ELLs in terms of reading struggles and comprehension in the American mainstream classroom and what can be done in the classroom to help meet their current needs. In...
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    • 30 What’s In What’s Out Use stories and speech to discuss language learning. Grammar, memorization, rote learning Kids are more tech-savvy so adults don’t matter anymore. Adult demonstrations of examples on the board. Challenging...
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    • 31 10. Progress may involve new kinds of errors as students try to apply new writing skills. 11. Grammar instruction should be included during various phases of writing. 12. More research is needed on effective ways of teaching grammar to...
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    • 31 We took our weekly trip to temple square with a smaller number of passengers. This group was less interested in the planned tour and just wanted to explore downtown Salt Lake. We did what we could to accommodate their requests while also...
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    • 36 Chapter 3 Methodology Action Research Introduction The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore why secondary students have a difficult time with sentence structure and punctuation. For years these students have had instruction on how to...
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    • 38 • Sentence Pattern Chart • Student Essays • Essay Tests (both pre and post) Observation is not only a main part of the Scientific Method, but it is also a part of Action Research as well. There are many ways that a teacher-research can observe a...

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