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    • Page 226

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    • 1 , 1920 for t h e following: 1. $9000 to install a modern a n d complete s t r e e t lighting system, owned a n d controlled b y t h e 2. $14,000 for establishing a n d improving t h e City City. Park. 3. $50,000 for increasing, improving,...
    • Page 235

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    • Excerpts from Cedar City Council Minutes Jan. 5, 1922.. .City Council met in regular session. Present: Mayor Parley Dalley and Councilmen--S. J. Foster, E . J . Palmer, Lehi M . Jones, Richard Williams, and John R . Robinson J r . F. Leigh as...
    • Page 11

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    • Writing Literacy is the tool wealth, not just economic wealth but wealth of the mind (Poore, 2011). Literacy allows students to know how to discriminate what they hear because students can participate as well as create (Poore, 2011). If teachers...
    • Page 22

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    • how to implement and use iPads on a daily basis with an assigned coach. The third step has the coaches work with the teacher throughout the year (Krzystowczyk , 2013). Another idea for helping teaches begin to set up curriculum using technology is...
    • Page 18

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    • 13 will help students become more successful in their vocabulary usage. Therefore, tier two words should make up a majority of the vocabulary instruction. Tier three words are specific, technical terms that are important in understanding the topic...
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    • 19 Retelling. Unlike summarizing, a retell is a recall of everything that was remembered from the reading. In a retelling the student is not concerned with the main idea and supporting details, but is instead concerned with the content as a whole....
    • Page 28

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    • 22 final status. It also frequently assesses progress so that slope of improvement can be quantified to indicate rate of improvement. The data produces accurate and meaningful information about levels of performance and rates of...
    • Page 34

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    • 28 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this thesis was (a) to compare the academic growth of the fourth-grade Cherry Hill Elementary English language learners (ELLs) to the academic growth of their native English speaking peers in math and...
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    • 29 an effective tool in closing the achievement gap in the Cherry Hill ELL students. NWEA data and scores from the 2010-2011 school year were used to identify differences between the English language learners’ academic growth and the native English...
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    • 30 filters and assessment reports to target ELLs’ instruction, the data would prove to be an effective tool in closing the achievement gap. Participants and Setting The participants in this study were the 2010-2011 fourth-grade students from Cherry...
    • Page 39

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    • 33 both groups combined. It was determined that each fourth-grade Cherry Hill student took between 14 and 25 language and math YPP assessments. Teachers were allowed to use YPP as a learning tool and assist the students during the assessments;...
    • Page 48

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    • 42 The Vineyard NWEA Math growth projections in Table 7 show that 5 out of 16 (31%) ELLs met their learning goals while 23 out of 64 (36%) of the native English speakers met their goal. Table 7 Percent of Mathematic Projected Growth Targets...
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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 8 students, especially young girls, to manipulate social situations in ways that result in relational aggression among peers. Defining Relational Aggression Relational aggression is a type of bullying that uses overt...
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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 21 Elementary, Meadowlark Elementary, Riley Elementary, Parkview Elementary, and Northstar Elementary. The female students were recruited by sending home a consent letter to parents requesting participation....
    • Page 26

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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 22 schools’ computer labs where the survey was completed and supervised by the researcher. Certain demographic information was collected and held strictly confidential, with no identities being exposed. The survey...
    • Page 18

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    • 12 ability to design curricula and alternative forms of assessment that would set their school’s educational objectives and experience apart from the traditional model—the very principle charter schools have been tasked with in the first place. In...
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    • 15 own education and professional training. More and more states are adopting professional exams to illustrate a teacher’s content knowledge and professional ability; in many states, employment hinges on passing such tests. Pamela Esprivalo Harrell...
    • Page 28

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    • 22 open-ended question were coded according to emerging themes. Finally, participants were given selected response items to choose from. Samples of surveys, as well as the open-ended question and selected response items are provided in appendices...
    • Page 31

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    • 25 attitude toward state-mandated testing. This research also examined teacher attitudes toward state-mandated testing as a tool to describe school performance and instructor performance as well as the reasons they chose to work at a charter school...

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