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    • Page 82

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    • THE WEB 83 Writing for the Web 23 2. Pick one of those actors. 3. Define what that actor wants to do on the site. Each thing the actor does on the site becomes a use case. 4. For each use case, decide on the normal course of events when that actor...
    • Page 81

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    • 74 Appendix E: Instrument Used for Final Assessment Final Exam ~ Romeo and Juliet Directions: Choose from one of the prompts below to write a 5-paragraph essay. You should have 7-10 sentences in each paragraph that will show your ability to discuss...
    • Page 84

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    • THE WEB 85 Writing for the Web 25 By analyzing what we know about Doug, we can make some assumptions about his web use and online buying habits related to outdoor equipment. Giv􀀍􀵥 en his Internet savvy he will probably not have any trouble...
    • Page 79

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    • 75 Guthrie, J.T., (2001). Contexts for engagement and motivation in reading. Reading Online, 4(8). Retrieved from: http://www.readingonline.org/articles/handbook/guthrie/ Guthrie, J.T., Wigfield, A. Metsala, J.L, & Cox, K. E. (1999) Motivational...
    • Page 35

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    • Figure 16: Student Texting Frequency Results: As illustrated in Figure 16, 75% of students text daily. Figure 17: Student Use of Social Media Frequency Results: As illustrated in Figure 17, 78% of responding students use social networking sites...
    • Page 120

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    • Intro to the Internet 107 and Web Page Design which is a browser command, as follows: . The element may be followed by one or more attributes like this: . Attributes may have a value assigned to...
    • Page 81

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    • 77 Schiefele, U., (1999). Interest and learning from text. Scientific Studies of Reading, 3, 257-279. Serafini, F. (2000). Before the conversations become “grand”. The California Reader, 33(3), 19-24 Stringer, S.A., Mollineaux, B. (2003) Removing...
    • Page 38

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    • Figure 22: Students’ View on the Fun of Using the iPad versus Handwriting Results: As illustrated in Figure 22, 58% of responding students view writing on an iPad as more fun than handwriting. Conclusion. The data indicates that students do not...
    • Page 88

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    • THE WEB 89 Writing for the Web 29 writing original content, it is important to keep a few familiar things in mind: 􀁳􇌀 􀀣􂌀􀁏􄼀􀁎􄸀􀁖􅘀􀁅􄔀􀁒􅈀􀁔􅐀 􀁐􅀀􀁁􄄀􀁓􅌀􀁓􅌀􀁉􄤀􀁖􅘀􀁅􄔀 􀁖􅘀􀁏􄼀􀁉􄤀􀁃􄌀􀁅􄔀 􀁔􅐀􀁏􄼀 􀁁􄄀􀁃􄌀􀁔􅐀􀁉􄤀􀁖􅘀􀁅􄔀 􀁖􅘀􀁏􄼀􀁉􄤀􀁃􄌀􀁅􄔀 􀁗􅜀􀁈􄠀􀁅􄔀􀁎􄸀􀁅􄔀􀁖􅘀􀁅􄔀􀁒􅈀 􀁐􅀀􀁏􄼀􀁓􅌀􀁓􅌀􀁉􄤀􀁂􄈀􀁌􄰀􀁅􄔀 􀁳􇌀 􀀵􃔀􀁓􅌀􀁅􄔀 􀁔􅐀􀁈􄠀􀁅􄔀...
    • Page 122

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    • Intro to the Internet 109 and Web Page Design ated with this dialog box and change the file type to “All Files.” You should now be able to see all the files in the folder. Important: Whenever you are opening or saving an HTML file, you must first...
    • Page 89

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    • THE WEB 90 30 sense out of its usual context. As we mentioned in the accessibility overview, many people who have vi􀀍􀵳 sion problems use screen readers to navigate web pages. Instead of having an entire web page read to them, these users can click...
    • Page 123

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    • 110 Chapter 7 HTML XHTML attempts to support all the rules of HTML using XHTML standards. If this all sounds confusing, don’t let it worry you. By learning HTML, you are also learning the basics of XHTML. There are some differ-ences but they are...
    • Page 8

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    • TIMELINE PROJECT 9 Vine has a rapidly growing marketshare for uploading and sharing video (Lunden, 2013). In short, there is no shortage of networks available to post and share content, whether it be text, photo, or video. Uses and...
    • Page 90

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    • THE WEB 91 Writing for the Web 31 described; the reader will not confuse it with possibly being about teaching, educational, volunteer, or computer experience. So, what can you use instead of “click here”? Clear, specific, and informa􀀍􀵴 tive text...
    • Page 124

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    • Intro to the Internet 111 and Web Page Design Figure 7.5 make a folder to temporarily store your work on your flash drive and transfer the content to the F: drive later). The web page we are making is based on the informal balance model we learned...
    • Page 91

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    • THE WEB 92 32 Sources American Disabilities Act. (2003). Accessibility of state and local government websites to people with disabilities. Retrieved December 2011, from ada.gov: http://www.ada.gov/websites2.htm Calabria, T. (2004). An introduction...
    • Page 125

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    • 112 Chapter 7 HTML end. The area in between will be used to enter the other tags and web content. Your Notepad window should now look like Figure 7.6. Note: the first tag wraps to a new line in the example above but you do not need to wrap it in...
    • Page 43

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    • handwrite, and why they do or do not feel they write better with their iPad. This could be due to lack of teacher training on how to implement iPads into the curriculum (Figure 6) or difficulty typing on a small computer. Social media New...
    • Page 127

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    • 114 Chapter 7 HTML because they form the skeleton or framework of the web page. The and tags define the so-called “header” of the web page. The header generally contains information that is not visible in the browser window. This...

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