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  • All fields: tasks
(113 results)



Display: 20

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    • 1 CHAPTER 1 Introduction -­‐ Nature of the Problem The connection between physical activity and student engagement is a heavily debated topic in the field of education. The health benefits of physical activity are well documented but the academic...
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    • 10 (2002) suggest that students must view reading as a pleasurable activity because “children who dislike something may avoid it or give only partial attention to learning it, although they have the self-confidence to learn lessons and attempt...
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    • 11 in their first language (L1); however, this is not always the case. Cooter (2006) describes the American Idol star, Fantasia Barrino, who recently wrote a memoir entitled Life Is Not a Fairy Tale (2005) that tells of her experiences as an...
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    • 11 on physical education may result in small gains in academic achievement and Grade Point Average. Observations show a positive connection between academic performance and physical activity, but not physical fitness. This meaning that a child’s ph...
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    • 13 The benefits of recess are more apparent with lower-­‐elementary students than upper-­‐elementary students because young children need more breaks throughout the day than older children in order to process information. Due to the cognitive i...
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    • 14 in an environment that is nurturing and supports student success (Vaughn & Fuchs, 2003). The National Research Council reiterates this thought when they write, “the nature and quality of classroom literacy instruction are a pivotal force in...
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    • 17 Currently, energizer programs are being designed by teachers to integrate physical activity into the academic curriculum. One example is the Take 10! Program. Take 10! is a classroom-­‐based physical activity program designed by the Internation...
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    • 18 discovery that emerged from this qualitative study were the differences in the amounts of literacy activities that took place per hour. For example, even though these families were all from low- SES backgrounds, researchers categorized them into...
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    • 18 McCabe, Margolis, & Barenbaum (2001) conducted a study that compared the Woodcock - Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised (WJ-R) and the QRI-II tests. The researchers discussed the importance of providing students with materials that were...
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    • 19 following the exercise. The researchers for this experiment suggested that physical activity might increase students’ cognitive control and ability to pay attention. The study was conducted by alternating 20-­‐minute periods of resting or wal...
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    • 22 Furthermore, Marinak and Gambrill have suggested that books as rewards for increased reading are a gratifying, successful reward for students. Specifically, when offering extrinsic rewards for reading, books are less undermining to intrinsic...
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    • 22 There are many trends found throughout all of these previous studies. First, decreasing or eliminating time for physical activity in order to accommodate for other academic subjects will not lead to improved student achievement. Second, increasing...
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    • 24 Procedures The tasks completed in order to meet the goals of this study were to administer the AIMSweb language arts curriculum-based measurements and the kindergarten teacher questionnaire using the following procedures to ensure reliability...
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    • 25 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Teachers can encourage a feeling on inclusion by always encouraging students to work together in diverse groups, not condoning negative or discriminatory remarks, and allowing each child to shine in his or her own wa...
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    • 27 Learning clubs (book clubs, literature circles) should be deliberate and specifically aimed at desired learning goals. To effectively motivate reluctant readers, teachers must help students experience autonomy in selecting interesting...
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    • 29 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING planned workshop took place after school in the training room at Monroe Elementary School. The training was split into three different sessions, with each session being approximately one hour. The workshop was closel...
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    • 29 reduce barriers. Teachers who were familiar with maintenance people were able to solicit their input for planting opportunities (Coffee & Rivkin,1998). An obtained copy of the physical plans for schools helped to avoid utility lines and other...
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    • 29 support those struggling students. Procedures To complete this study, the researcher developed a math homework tracker to obtain a better idea of what is being done at home to support students in day to day learning objectives. This tracker was...
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    • 30 Appendix D. Appendix E contains a display of projects created or collected for the Master Project. The researcher anticipated completion of this creative project during the fall semester of 2010. A summary of the tasks required to complete this...
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    • 32 Chapter 4 Results Throughout the researcher’s Master of Education Capstone project, five vital educational resources were monitored to effectively determine the ability and growth among students identified as lacking parental support. First,...

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