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  • All fields: succeed
(162 results)



Display: 20

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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Nature of the problem There is a tremendous amount of pressure placed upon students and teachers to achieve proficient scores on end of level math testing. High expectations dealing with math have created many different...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Reading is an essential tool for existence in our modern society. While some children and adults struggle with learning basic reading concepts, a common problem of reading reluctance exists in classrooms across the nation....
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Recently there has been strong scientific evidence pointing to a potential link between the mind and the body, suggesting improved cognitive results when movement is added to the learning process (Jensen, 2005). However,...
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    • 10 Another important contributing factor to the success or failure of a student is the level of involvement parents provide in the home. Even as children transition through the middle school ages “Parents continue to be an important source of...
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    • 10 learning disabilities or those who just struggle in general. Many of these students also have difficulty understanding vocabulary as it relates to their world. Effective Instruction Finding the best programs and the most effective means of...
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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
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    • 12 rest of their lives. When limits are given, options are taken and enjoyment limited to one area of life or fitness (Torres & Hager, 2007). Also, if we turn our PE classes into giant arenas for intense competitions, teachers leave out the major...
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    • 13 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING their nondisabled classmates. Furthermore, Seehorn (n.d.) points out that by being included, students will be exposed to opportunities for problem solving that will help them as they function outside of the classroom...
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    • 14 allowed to draw the ideas presented (Nolen, 2003). He/she likes to work with maps, puzzles, charts, visualizations and images (Denig, 2004). Students all benefit from visuals. Today, individuals with learning disabilities are mainstreamed. Chris...
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    • 14 the school by using funds from the Effective Teaching and Learning Literacy Program (USDOE, 2010a). These government programs are examples of how educators and scholars are redefining literacy as the term expands into the experiences and lives...
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    • 14 Where parents are capable of guiding the child and are inclined to supervise the home study, their children succeed in school. But where the parents are illiterate or for other reasons are unable to supervise the home study, their children as...
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    • 15 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Tradition Tradition is also a barrier (Downing, 2008). Traditionally, students with disabilities have been served in the special education room and not been included as part of the regular classroom. Because schools...
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    • 15 need to be developed so that they provide new ways to assess the non-cognitive skills that students need to succeed in college and in the workplace. Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) proposes that a growth-based evaluation be included into...
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    • 15 With regard to reading, basic oral English language vocabulary is not enough to help ELLs succeed academically. They may read and speak fluently but if they do not have the breadth and depth of the vocabulary, they struggle. They need to see...
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    • ! 15! therefore (3) subverts efforts to teach children to accept competition as unavoidable and desirable” (Kohn, 1998, pgs. 51 – 56). Roger Johnson and David Johnson have conducted numerous studies on cooperative learning within the classroom. In...
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    • 16 A School for Healing (1999) claimed that it is one of the most powerful interventions that could be used with at-risk students. Summary The collaborative group setting in all of these intervention examples helped increase graduation rates and...
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    • 16 For educators, the challenge is to continue to investigate and develop new programs to help all students to perform and achieve their full potential. Research and development of new teaching techniques will always be a continuing effort in...
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    • 17 (Marzano, et al., 2001, p. 82). The bodily/kinesthetic learner has “specific physical skills such as coordination, balance, dexterity, strength, flexibility, and speed, as well as proprioceptive, tactile, and haptic capacities” (Armstrong, 1994,...
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    • 18 teachers concerning how MyAccess! scores. The same report notes that in response to the statement, “MyAccess! gives fair and accurate scores” student responses averaged 3.5 on a scale of 5. Teacher responses were 2.8 (2010). In another...
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    • 19 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING specific eligibility requirements, students are “falling through the cracks”. Researchers believe that the real world is not divided into “regular” and “special,” and therefore, the dual system of special education a...

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