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    • Page 17

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    • 10 discovered that the books may be for children on one level, but on other levels they speak to older students and adults” (Spicer, 2003, p. 5). According to Furner, Yahya, and Duffy (2005) there are benefits of using literature...
    • Page 108

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    • 101 complained when anything they were required to accomplish took more time than they thought it should. Students’ understanding of math was very interesting. Pupils leaned towards disagreeing with the statement, “Math brings out my...
    • Page 112

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    • 105 Chapter 6 Reflection I discovered through interviews that the majority of the students involved in the creative project preferred working in groups. Allowing students to choose the group members exhibited excitement. Explaining the assignments...
    • Page 117

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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
    • Page 18

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    • 12 Furthermore, digital forensics community also expresses their concerns on the need of an organization or body that can monitor the accreditation of a digital forensics programs that currently or will be available in the market [Rog04]. When...
    • Page 18

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    • 12 supports” (Ysseldyke, Burns, Scholin, & Parker, 2010, p.58). Tier 2 intervention, generally consists of small group differentiated instruction that is explicit and systematic (Bursuck & Blanks, 2010; Greenfield et al., 2010; Vaughn & Fuchs,...
    • Page 127

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    • 120 Name'--- _ Class Period _ TAU.YSHEET FOR LEARNING S1YLEASSESSMENT Li.r b..-lll... ~·"ur IlL,n,bcT re'l'O'1lOC rur~·a..·la 9,...llt'iorl nil til" appl'''''Pri3l'l:'' line, (1:01' ......;1I\1J'L.- if~"lIT rc"!:,,,.1lOC t" #I ".~ .1, puc...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING their nondisabled classmates. Furthermore, Seehorn (n.d.) points out that by being included, students will be exposed to opportunities for problem solving that will help them as they function outside of the classroom...
    • Page 20

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    • 13 mathematical/logical person starts early by ordering and re-ordering objects. The individual calculates quickly and memorizes long tables of information, like bus schedules (Nolen, 2003). Mathematical/Logical in Math The mathematical/logical...
    • Page 19

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    • 13 Mattos, & Weber, 2009, p. 28). Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, and Young (2003) prefer standard protocol because “everyone knows what to implement, and it is easier to train practitioners to conduct an intervention correctly and to assess the accuracy of...
    • Page 18

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    • 13 that they feel are better to spend their time. These researchers seem to make the same point: students are not going to do well on tasks that do not have value to them. Both the effects of negative attitudes and self-efficacy lead students to...
    • Page 19

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    • 14 These findings suggest that students need more stimulation in order to develop higher levels of thinking and cognition. Teaching mathematics through problem solving refers to the process of having students solve problems using any method that...
    • Page 152

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    • 144 Appendix E Collection of Real-life math assignments/activities Seven stories were chosen for the first activity from Math Stories for Problem Solving Success (Overholt, et. al., 1990). They were Tessa’s grounding, Jake’s surprise, The Pro...
    • Page 20

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    • 15 (Ruffell et al., 1998; Hoyles, 1992). Hoyles (1992) points out that students begin to understand teachers’ feelings about mathematics at an early age, and this attitude transference affects students learning. Teachers need to be confident and...
    • Page 22

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    • 15 understanding. Foldables encourage “reading, writing, thinking, organizing data, researching, and other communication skills into an interdisciplinary mathematics curriculum” (Zike, n.d., p. iv). Foldables can be used to implement other...
    • Page 21

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    • 16 prompts them to think about the salient features of each problem. This discussion helps them gage what they do and do not understand, as well as develop their own problem solving strategies (Cooper, 1999). Many educational theorists have...
    • Page 175

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    • 167 http://www.ct4me.net/math_projects.htm Math Stories for Problem Solving Success (Overholt, et.al., 1990) Hands-On Math Projects with Real-Life Applications (Muschla and Muschla, 2006)
    • Page 22

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    • 17 the assignment and give sufficient background information to get students started (Cobb et al., 1991). With sufficient information, students are then able to ask questions to clarify and interpret the assignment and begin constructing several...
    • Page 24

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    • 19 solutions need more work (Lester, 1994). Many teachers want to assure that students do not make mistakes while solving problems. Making mistakes allows teachers opportunities to teach a lesson as students find that their solutions or methods did...
    • Page 7

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    • 2 develop problem solving strategies that can be applied to various situations throughout life (Fuson et al., 2000). Another study found that students who participated in problem solving instruction performed as well as, or better than, students...

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