Skip to main content

SUU Digital Library

Add or remove other collections to your search:



Narrow your search by:



You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: skill
(106 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 5

    •  
    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction- Nature of the Problem Every year students enter kindergarten with varying ability levels and with an array of educational backgrounds. While several students have attended a preschool or received some form of...
    • Page 15

    •  
    • 11 In a research study conducted by O’Connor et al. (2000), a group of kindergarteners’ literacy progress was monitored and tracked over two years. During this time, students who were considered “at-risk” were given four tiers of...
    • Page 18

    •  
    • 12 Furthermore, digital forensics community also expresses their concerns on the need of an organization or body that can monitor the accreditation of a digital forensics programs that currently or will be available in the market [Rog04]. When...
    • Page 15

    •  
    • 13 included in student files as part of the researcher’s improvement plan to the Pro-Active Skill Building Program. It is intended by the researcher to encourage faculty and staff at the study site to incorporate these preventative interventions...
    • Page 17

    •  
    • 13 irrelevant in overall student achievement. The only statistical significance was the impact that it had on the level of teacher support that was given to students (Santi, York, Foorman, & Francis). The same study also shows that: Students who do...
    • Page 18

    •  
    • 14 (a) the measures have the necessary psychometric characteristics for reliable and valid measurement; (b) the measures are quick to administer and are thus feasible for regular use in school settings; (c) the measures have multiple alternate...
    • Page 17

    •  
    • 15 Inclusion is the least restrictive of the four timeout procedures. Inclusion involves placing a student in a separate area inside the classroom where instruction can be observed, but where interaction with peers is denied for a given period of...
    • Page 20

    •  
    • 16 that may be part of the problem” (para. 363). Research shows that educators are able to enhance academic achievement (Condron) through ability grouping. This method is explained as “…the process of teaching students in groups that are...
    • Page 21

    •  
    • 18 lessons. The goals of school gardens were primarily for academic and social development. Secondary goals were recreational and therapeutic (Blair, 2009). The DeNarco, Relf, & McDaniel study also investigated the academic subjects studied in...
    • Page 22

    •  
    • 19 This information advocates the idea that AES systems are most beneficial to lower-level or general education students. The most surprising thing about this finding is that it is close. It would be expected that the lowest students would get the...
    • Page 24

    •  
    • 2 1 6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a...
    • Page 6

    •  
    • 2 Background, Significance, and Purpose Setting Before students start their kindergarten year in the local school district, they are given a series of individual kindergarten assessments. During this 25 minute appointment, the student...
    • Page 4

    •  
    • 2 decisions in the regular classroom. Therefore, students who have been placed in the Pro-Active Skill Building Program will potentially be better apt to exhibit behaviors that are more acceptable, allowing them to experience success in the regular...
    • Page 27

    •  
    • 21 counterparts (NAEP, 2011). RTI gives educators the flexibility to meet the needs of diverse learners to help all students find success in learning to read. Another group of students who would benefit from the focused and individualized nature of...
    • Page 25

    •  
    • 21 Fantuzzo et al., 2005; Mead, 2008). Caucasian and Asian children demonstrated higher levels of skill in reading (Al Otaiba, Kosanovich-Grek, Torgesen, Hassler, & Wahl). Research by Fantuzzo et al. concluded “African American, Hispanic, and...
    • Page 26

    •  
    • 22 Furthermore, Marinak and Gambrill have suggested that books as rewards for increased reading are a gratifying, successful reward for students. Specifically, when offering extrinsic rewards for reading, books are less undermining to intrinsic...
    • Page 25

    •  
    • 22 role in the implementation of AES systems. Teacher, however, have the ultimate responsibility to determine if an AES program in is the best interest of the students. Teacher Role in MyAccess! Program The teacher is meant to play a valuable role in...
    • Page 25

    •  
    • 23 Research confirms that the most critical relationship regarding student achievement remains the connection between teacher and parent. Maintaining open communications between the teacher, the student, and the parent is crucial. Successful...
    • Page 26

    •  
    • 24 carried out by all teachers. The researcher intends to strengthen the program by developing formatted materials with the purpose of improving teacher reflection and increasing parent involvement. The goal of improving teacher reflection is to...

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK