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  • All fields: singing
(65 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 228

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    • following are the minutes of the meeting held August 12, 1858: The members met at the meeting house two o'clock p.m.on Thursday. Sister A. Haight gave the meeting into the hands of Brother Henry Lunt, he being present. Opened the meeting by...
    • Page 234

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    • nail machines and intend to make our own nails. We have spent $20,000 dollars to make iron and, if those engaged in the business had not had the devil in them, we should have made good iron before now.' Mormon constmction activities were hampered...
    • Page 12

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    • EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC 8 need (Wigram &Gold, 2006). From ancient times, people have had the idea that music can express emotion. Some also believe that music can actually produce emotion. These two different ideas may help explain the...
    • Page 237

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    • RESOLVED, That as officers and eniployees of the Bank of Southern Utah, of which he was President, we express herein our appreciation of LEHI W. JONES, our abiding respect for his memory, and our sincere sympathy to his bereaved family and friends....
    • Page 19

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    • EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC 15 Does Background Music Really Help? Although there have been many studies that have shown improvement in behavior and academic success, there are some studies that make one think differently. In one study, students...
    • Page 259

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    • the Indians around Cedar City remained quite peaceful. Still, the settlers always stayed alert since they knew Ute waniors were raiding other commu~ties. On the 24th of July in 1865 the people of Washington, St. George and Santa Clara, with a...
    • Page 261

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    • the preceding day attended by President Erastus Snow [President of the Southem Mission], Elder Richard Robiion of Pinto Creek, James H. M a y of Harmony, John Hamilton of Hamilton's Fort, Patriarch Elisha H. Groves of Kanarra, Bishop Willis of T o...
    • Page 14

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    • City, so the population grew very quickly. The residents looked forward in anticipation to each new company because, not only were they glad to see relatives and friends who had followed, but they always brought mail with them from Kanesville which...
    • Page 44

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    • JOHN CHATTERLEY Biography 1835 - 1922 John Chatterley, a member of the first group of colonizers to settle Cedar City, was born in Salford,, a s u b u r b of Manchester, England, July 4 , 1835, the son of Joseph and Nancy Morton Chatterley. He had...
    • Preface - Page xi

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    • PREFACE I t was a clear, warm day. The atmosphere was so transparent that the mountains many miles ahead seemed to he just a stone's throw away. A young sandy-haired man with clear blue eyes was walking a l o n ~ leading a large sorrel horse...
    • Page 283

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    • scratched the bamyard faithfuily for the support of the brood. They tumed the house into an i m and, though it was but sparsely funiished, it was spotlessly clean as 1 know, for 1 sat part of the afternoon in the kitchen The wife who was busiest...
    • Page 284

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    • sex of the telegrapher at the place we had left in the morning, when Mrs. Lunt remarked to her sister-wife that 'Parowan has been c d e d by St. George three times without answering. She will go to meeting!' Mr. Lunt did what he could to help, poor...
    • Page 19

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    • ticks and buckskin were made to serve as clothing materials, nntil sheep became more plentiful. Anything the people had to spare was traded to the Indians for huckskin which could he used for clothing and moccasins. The people made everything they...
    • Page 307

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    • attracted many visitors, prospectors and mining officials who traveled n through Cedar City. The mine was located i a ndge of broken mountains near Leeds and came into existence in the 1870's, &er silver had been discovered in a sandstone ledge....
    • Page 52

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    • In 1867, Josiah Rogerson, who was schooled in the operation of the telegraph, came from Beaver to Cedar City to give instruction to interested people who could hegin operating the telegraph line in Cedar City. Among those to be instructed were...
    • Page 71

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    • ladies of the Relief Society for advice and suggestions. I will not attempt to say what good was accomplished." "In the !ear 1876 the name was changed from Retrenchment to Mutual Improvement Association. The name implied what it was first intended...
    • Page 98

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    • Henry and Ellen, along with the rest of the Stake Presidency, dined with the John D. Lees. At two o'clock the trumpet sounded again to gather the people together. There was dancing until midnight interspersed with singing, comic readings, and...
    • Page 112

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    • ofthe mountains were blessed with an array of trained laborers. This was a vital factor in the success of the Mormons as color~izers.~ Experienced workers had been sent to southern Utah to help in the manufacture of iron, but they were encountering...

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