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    • Page 84

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    • Emotions in Conflict 79 Future Research In conducting future research, it is recommended that teachers from several different communities and many different elementary schools be interviewed. While the influence of emotions in this study was...
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    • BMI AND WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION 15 for treating smoking or drinking (Sturm, 2002). In the United States alone, obesity-related problems account for 6% to 10% of the national health care expenditures (Finkelstein, Fiebelkorn, & Wang, 2003). In a study...
    • Page 43

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 44 Chapter VI Discussion As hypothesized, correlations between preference for group leadership style and psychological domain were indicated by results of the survey administered in this study. These results...
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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 45 work with a specific leader or training one leader to work with five or six group members, most organizations prefer to train one leader rather than five or six group members. Therefore, knowing that a...
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    • TIMELINE PROJECT 21 This section is presented as an examination of some of the logic and concepts in the code; although tangetial to the communication theory applications of the project, the technical discussion in this section presents a closer...
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    • BMI AND WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION 19 bias that is similar to those that are leaner, suggesting that obese people themselves harbor negative feelings towards “fat people”. Those that are overweight hold negative associations with being overweight...
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    • BMI AND WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION 22 Conclusion The discrimination that obese and overweight persons experience in the workplace, social settings, healthcare settings and even from their own beliefs about themselves suggest that stigmas and stereotypes...
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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 51 technique, the uncertainty reduction theory explains that communication creates uncertainty and individuals involved in the setting seek to reduce it. The application of the uncertainty reduction theory...
    • Page 51

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 52 the definition of “self” held by one member of the group and how that definition of “self” aligns with other group members. Individuals in groups tend relate to, and therefore prefer, other group members...
    • Page 53

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    • 49 not meant to be followed at the expense of the students. I will adjust each year to best meet the needs to the individual students in each class. I am excited to continue to work on this outline and modify it so it will be acceptable for future...
    • Page 55

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 56 are oriented toward this pre-group formation factor, the implication of this study precedes the theories discussed above. Rather than waiting for a group to meet and relationships to develop among group...
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    • 18 lessons. The goals of school gardens were primarily for academic and social development. Secondary goals were recreational and therapeutic (Blair, 2009). The DeNarco, Relf, & McDaniel study also investigated the academic subjects studied in...
    • Page 57

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 58 been dominant because group members select leaders who are similar to themselves, or leaders who they perceive will create the lowest levels of uncertainty. Contingency theory suggests that group leaders,...
    • Page 113

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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 109 Chapter 6: Conclusion The research done herein regarding medical receptionists’ self-reported viewpoints of the medical field has been a very introductory study. This research begins to give insight as to how receptionists...
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    • 6 Introduction Media is a fundamental part of the learning experience. Throughout a typical day, it is common for a student to engage in various media to supplement their learning process. Students and teachers use media –from video to printed...
    • Page 68

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    • 62 Appendix A Consent Letters in English and Spanish January 2011 Dear Parents, You and your child are being invited to take part in a research study about literacy. 26 students and parents combined from Ms. Berglund’s and Mrs. Stansell’s class...
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    • 63 January 2011 Dear Parents, You and your child are being invited to take part in a research study about literacy. 26 students and parents combined from Ms. Berglund’s and Mrs. Stansell’s class will be participating. In addition, I am inviting you...
    • Page 39

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    • /my_timeline/CHANGELOG.markdown 1 # 0.1.0 2 * [BUGFIX] Fix the settings to reload in development mode 3 * [BUGFIX] Fix the user stub * [FEATURE] Display event's times with the User's timezone, and make the time formatting configura ble 4 * [BUGFIX]...
    • Page 119

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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 115 These receptionist’s thoughts illustrate yet another gap in the organizational research of medical receptionists. Age can be a strong cultural factor in many circumstances, both personal and professional and thus impacts...

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