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    • Page 42

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 38 Table 5 Mean Response to Student Outcome Statements 3 and 12 Survey Item Mean Response Out of 6.0 #3 RTI has resulted in a proactive system that better meets the needs of all students. 5 #12 RTI has...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 43 Teachers were asked to measure their level of fidelity of RTI implementation on a one to six scale, with six being a high level of fidelity. The range varied from a score of three to six. A nine of the...
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    • 8 James, 1998). The high school senior has become accustomed to the conveniences of having instant access to information and communication by means of the Internet and cell phones. Social media provides a communication platform to connect with this...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 46 changes they are making are having positive results. Fourteen of the participants in this study have witnessed that RTI has resulted in a proactive system that better meets the needs of all students....
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    • DECLARATIVE KNOWLEDGE AND ACCELERATION 34 knowledge leads to better acceleration sprint performance. However, uncontrollable circumstances made this study design unattainable. Another point to consider is that the study participant who scored the...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 14 that character education happened, either mindlessly or mindfully, it was best for schools to overtly and purposefully foster students’ self-efficacy and social competence. Carter (2011) spoke of the necessity...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 52 Appendix A Survey Tool Teachers Perceptions on School-wide RTI Implementation Using the scale below, please select the number that best describes your response to the following statements. 1 2 3 4 5...
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    • NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION IN INSTANT MESSAGING 33 Item 7 asked the participants to assess the speaking/typing fluency of their dyad partners. The mean result was 3.63 (s = .81), showing an answer of adequate to good. This continues to show that not...
    • Page 27

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    • 20 which is first, Prewrite; second, Write; third, Revise; fourth, Edit; and finally, Publish. As paradigms shifted, “The writing process was at the heart of the student-centered composition class, where the product was de-emphasized, along with a...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS to demonstrate the skill, but he or she does not demonstrate fluency at it yet. These deficits were remediated by providing multiple opportunities for practice of the targeted skill in non-threatening situations. When...
    • 1956_001 22

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    • '• I , CEDAR CITY, UTAH 17 SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS ACCREDITATION The College of Southern Utah is accredited bv the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools. It is also accredited and recognized by other institutions on the same basis as...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS In one study involving the effects of social skills training in a class-wide setting, Kamps, Barbetta, Leonard, and Delquadri (1994) found that peer-trainings and interventions done on a class-wide basis benefitted the...
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    • KUDZU Leadership 11 evaluation of the work was a valuable tool for learning about what I did well and what areas can be improved. One reason Kudzu principles work for a presentation regarding a topic as broad as leadership is the uniqueness of the...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 29 315). These skills also included employing varied approaches, seeking novel strategies when old ones fail, putting forth more effort to accomplish a task, persisting longer, and experiencing decreased stress...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 34 the impact of social emotional interventions on students’ academic success. Finally, the House Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth, and Families (2000) provided testimonial support for character education’s...
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    • CWSW 52 The second set of questions, which dealt with participant’s confidence after attending the workshop resulted in average to higher confidences. Participants confidence to interview (M = 3.8, SD = .87) stayed the same, even after attending...
    • Page 52

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    • 48 and returned homework assignments almost every day. This finding agreed with the research in that “The empirical evidence shows that parental engagement is one of the key factors in securing higher student achievement and school improvement”...
    • Page 43

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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS Teacher surveys as well as student observation data indicate met goals. Teacher surveys indicated a 30% increase in personal confidence level from pre to post surveys. 73% of those indicated a 50% or greater increase...

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