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    • Page 9

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    • 3 on the notion that social interaction nurtures cognitive development. With a new perspective of how learning takes place, Vygotsky felt social learning happens first before child development occurs. As cited in the Learning Theories Knowledgebase...
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    • 8 Chapter 2 Literature Review When children enter school, they bring an array of experiences and background knowledge to the classroom as they try to understand their new world of learning in the academic world away from home. In terms of literacy,...
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    • 10 deprived of learning because of their social isolation and lack of interaction, which affected their overall cognitive functioning. As a result, Vygotsky set out to transform education in Russia by creating new pedagogical styles that would...
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    • 17 of how Purcell-Gates (1995) provided reading intervention for Donny in exchange for documentation and careful examination of literacy development through the social and cultural perspectives of a family from the “white underclass, a minority...
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    • 18 discovery that emerged from this qualitative study were the differences in the amounts of literacy activities that took place per hour. For example, even though these families were all from low- SES backgrounds, researchers categorized them into...
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    • 21 there is a possibility that someone else in the home is (Haneda, 2006). ELL out-of-school “literacy practices are typically bilingual or multilingual in nature” (Haneda, 2006, p. 339), as they are associated with religion and parental...
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    • 59 Learning Theories Knowledgebase. (2010). Social Development Theory (Vygotsky) at Learning-Theories.com. Retrieved October 10th, 2010 from http://www.learning-theories. com/vygotskys-social-learning-theory.html Macmillan/McGraw-Hill. (2006)....
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 27 raised by mothers deprived of their basic rights; impoverishment; and, violation of their fundamental dignity. The harms against men include: the unequal distribution of spouses and related ostracism of younger men forced to...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 39 Chapter 3: Method Ethnography An ethnographic approach to research allows researchers to immerse themselves into a culture and collect naturalistic data. Naturalistic data consists of real-world observations rather than...
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    • 7 Chapter 2 Literature Review Math can pose problems for students, teachers, and parents alike. This project examines peer-revised research to determine common characteristics of successful and not so successful math students, teachers, and home...
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    • 39 Chapter 5 Discussion This project was implemented in the researchers’ sixth grade math class in hopes of devising a structured remedy in aiding those students who receive insufficient help from home on daily math concepts. The researcher...
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    • 47 somewhat disappointing discovery was that even when the researcher was actively involved in providing additional daily support, the students’ scores, as a whole, increased minimally. From this disappointing discovery, the researcher came to...
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    • 56 Appendix A- IRB Approval and Parental Consent Form Beverley Taylor Sorenson College of Education and Human Development Graduate Studies in Education To: Dr. Deborah Hill, Interim Dean From: Bruce Barker, Chair College IRB Committee Date: January...
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    • 21 counterparts (NAEP, 2011). RTI gives educators the flexibility to meet the needs of diverse learners to help all students find success in learning to read. Another group of students who would benefit from the focused and individualized nature of...
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    • 25 Conclusion In summary, RTI as Fuchs & Fuchs (2006) explain is a “multilayered structure . . . implemented in the early grades to strengthen the intensity and effectiveness of reading instruction for at-risk students, preventing chronic school...
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    • 56 Consideration of Time and Numbers Involved in Interventions Besides noting a lack of focus on pinpointing and adjusting Tier 2 intervention to meet specific needs of individuals, teachers in this study identified approximately 30 percent...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS Chapter 2 Literature Review In the history of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) Asperger syndrome is a relatively new diagnosis. It has only been recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 19 outcomes, from “ineffective” to “highly effective”. Based on their research, Gresham et al. (2001) provided a number of recommendations in designing an effective social skills intervention, including...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS programs. Lane et. al. defined organizing intervention groups as the third step in the process. Groups could be organized by class designation, skill deficit targeted, demographics, or even randomly. Training...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS A log of events was kept to document student, teacher, and parent trainings. Dates of trainings as well as topics covered were recorded. Teacher and parent responses recorded with surveys at the end of trainings drove...

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