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    • 1.1 DUCT TAPE Adhesive tape, more specifically, masking tape was invented sometime in the 1920's by Richard Drew. He worked for the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, now known as 3M. Duct tape was originally manufactured by the Johnson &...
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    • 10 fueled considerable anxiety around school board members and administrators, many of who had farm or small town backgrounds. Enthusiastic supporters were drawn to the promise of school gardens not only as a way to better implement nature study...
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    • 15 Due to the success of Champlain College degree program, they moved one step ahead by offering a Master degree program [Kes08]. However, this program concentrates on digital forensics investigation management and only had few subjects tht touched...
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    • 2 Chapter 1 Introduction- Nature of the Problem School gardens have constituted a valuable opportunity to integrate curriculum and provide hands-on learning. The school garden movement planted itself in numerous education philosophies including...
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    • 21 A 2005 study of fifth graders across three inner city Baton Rouge schools conducted by, J.L. Smith and C.E. Mostenbocjer, found that gardens in the school correlated with a higher achievement in science (Blair, 2009, p. 23). In a separate...
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    • 22 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this study was to examine the academic gains of students entering kindergarten at below-grade level, on-grade level, and above-grade level, to determine the amount of progress made throughout the year....
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    • 22 It has been observed that the most effective teachers are those who recognize that they have much more to learn and thus seek opportunities for continuing professional development (Parris & Block, 2008). The world of education is constantly...
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    • 24 same time, citizens of industrialized nations, the United States chief among them, [were] becoming alienated from the sources of food they eat” (Gow 2005). “To decrease the threat of the obesity epidemic, children need to broaden the...
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    • 26 contest. This study found that ninety-seven percent of the school gardens were used primarily for environmental education. Barriers to School Gardens Barriers to school gardens were obstacles that stood in the way, limited or slowed school...
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    • 27 Question 6: Please talk about what you think were the most positive aspects of your involvement in service. What were the most challenging or negative aspects, if any? As was the case with Question Three, this question wasn’t central to the...
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    • 28 control group that received no books from the SETHL. The groups were formed to be as academically equal as possible using the most recent DIBELS scores. These study participants were found in the 58 percent of kindergarten students who spoke...
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    • 3 9 teachers the data that was collected from using the Spelling Connections program, I would hope to convince them of the importance of taking the time to teach spelling. Tier 2 and Tier 3 students in the study, made huge gains and most are now...
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    • 32 Teachers strongly agreed that there [was] a need for multiple resources, such as curriculum linked to instruction, teacher training for gardening and its connection to curriculum, and lessons on teaching nutrition in the garden… the pressure...
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    • 44 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Chapter 6 Reflection As I reflected on this project, I realized it impacted the majority of the students and staff at Monroe Elementary School. I felt that this project was well received by all involved and will prod...
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    • 45 Results and Explanations The composite scores in the reading portion of the MAP assessment showed double and triple the expected gains by students who read from the SETHL. Total non-readers achieved expected growth of 4 points, while students...
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    • 46 and English. On average, students who were Spanish-English readers read 13 minutes each day for 25 days, while students who read from the English books read 20 minutes per day for 24 days. The students and parents who read from the...
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    • 48 Limitations This study was completed with a small group of Hispanic kindergarten students. The students who chose to read from the SETHL were compared with students who were not given the chance to read or who chose not to read. The students of...
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    • 50 Chapter 6 Reflection Looking back at this project, I have been able to witness, first hand, the important role that parents play in their child’s academic success. As a teacher I understood that those students that did not receive help from...

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