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  • All fields: reading
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Display: 20

    • 1905, page 21

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    • 21 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. Fifth Year. First Half. Second Half. Physical Education 1 and 2 2 2 Elective 3 3 History of Education 3 Pedagogy …………………………. 3 Special Methods 5 5 Training………………………….. 4 4 ...
    • Page 91

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    • 87 Appendix H ERAS Assessment Tool Used To Determine Pre and Post Reading Interest
    • Page 14

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    • EDUCATION REFORM IN AMERICA 13 the children responded to the divorce/separation of parents. In his study Arkes discovered that reading comprehension becomes especially difficult for children who experience a divorce. In 1991 Paul Amato and Bruce...
    • Page 50

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    • 46 CONTROL GROUP (Prior Treatment) CONTROL GROUP (After Treatment) Figure 9. The results of survey question number 4 before and after for the control group. I Like to Talk About What I'm Reading With an Adult When I'm Finished...
    • Page 13

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    • E1CU’s 2015 Annual Meeting 13 Pinterest, like many other social-bookmarking sites saves ideas to a specific board; the difference is that Pinterest uses pictures that are more pleasing to look at than an underlined blue link (Holtz, 2012). Although...
    • Page 51

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    • 47 EXPERIMENTAL GROUP (Prior Treatment) EXPERIMENTAL GROUP (After Treatment) Figure 10. The results of survey question number 4 before and after for the experimental group. I Like To Talk About What I'm Reading With an Adult When I'm Finished...
    • Page 48

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    • 42 Figure 1. Language in the Home: Students Figure 2. Language in the Home: Parents five minutes a day = 2, 15 minutes a day = 3, 30 minutes a day = 4, and more than 45 minutes a day = 5. The results showed that high and low ELLs spend almost the...
    • Page 52

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    • 48 Summary The data from the survey questions indicate that on all four questions, student’s attitudes and opinions about reading, understanding what they read, and their feelings about reading with adults significantly changed in a positive...
    • 1910, page 18

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    • 18 payment of all martriculation fees; fifty appointments to these scholarships, each for a term of four years, may be made annually; provided that any holder of free scholarships who shall have obtained the same prior to January 1, 1900, is...
    • Page 49

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    • 43 home. Both high and low ELLs received homework help from family members on a regular basis, which included parents, cousins, aunts, and grandparents. These averages were based on a 5-point scale: never = 1, rarely = 2, sometimes = 3, most of the...
    • Page 7

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    • 5 administrator, the skills coach, the special education teachers, and if needed, the district psychologist. The researcher worked closely with the skills coach in order to effectively implement the improvement plan. The school administrator aided...
    • Page 53

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    • 49 Chapter 5 – Discussion As a result of this creative research project, it was intended that if an at-home reading program was implemented and parents were better informed about the importance of reading with meaning and purpose, as well as being...
    • Page 54

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    • 50 Important Findings The first findings that need to be discussed were those discovered at the parent training, for which there is no specific data, but rather feedback from parents given to the researcher. It was surprising to note that attending...
    • Page 51

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    • 45 Quantitative Data: Language and Literacy in the School All of the high ELLs preferred to speak only English with their peers at school. More than half of low ELLs preferred to speak both English and Spanish (see Table 6). The majority of low...
    • Page 55

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    • 51 There was an increase of only 1.4 words per minute with the control group’s fluency rate from the beginning to the end of the ten-week period. However, the difference in the experimental group’s rate from before and after the ten-week period was...
    • Page 52

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    • 46 column 2, the averages of parents visiting the public library was measured on a 4-point scale: never = 1, once per year = 2, once per month = 3, once per week = 4. Parents of high ELLs go to the family center more often and are 69% more likely...
    • Page 56

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    • 52 fact, most parents were having surprisingly positive experiences. The researcher has included two different feedback worksheets taken from the homework assignments to represent this discussion (see Appendix D). These worksheets were used as a...
    • Page 53

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    • 47 ELL parents. Table 9 presents averages of ELL parents’ attitudes toward literacy. Both columns 1 and 2 were measured on a 4-point scale: do not like it at all = 1, it is okay = 2, I like it = 3, and I love it = 4. In general, both sets of...
    • Page 57

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    • 53 thoughtfully to what they read, and that their response is valued, there is a positive correlation between an increased motivation to read, and a more meaningful reading experience. So what does all of this mean for the researcher, the...
    • Page 54

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    • 48 every day = 5. High ELLs used their computers to access digital literacies 23% more than low ELLs. It is important to note that both groups of ELLs took advantage of digital literacies in the HLE. More than half of both high and low ELLs who had...

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