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    • Author's Note - Page vii

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    • AUTHOR'S NOTE After ten years of research and hours of writing and editing, York and I submit this work to the reader with confidence and satisfaction that it will stand upon its own merits. This is a book about an honest, dedicated man and his...
    • Page 439

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    • Although she died when 1was but eleven years old, her sweet and noble infiuence has permeated my iife. Any child should be wnsidered fortunate, indeed, who has had the pnvilege of close association with a grandrnother of such sweet character. There...
    • Page 17

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    • technology in literacy classrooms is more technological integration than curricular integration. (Hutchison, et al., 2012). This means that more teachers aren’t using technology daily to enhance students’ learning (Hutchison, et al., 2012). Heitin...
    • Page 19

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    • 14 Another suggestion to activate interest and increase students’ vocabulary about a specific topic is through the use of informational alphabet books (Yopp & Yopp, 2000). Prior to studying a specific topic, the teacher will have students...
    • Page 24

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    • 19 Retelling. Unlike summarizing, a retell is a recall of everything that was remembered from the reading. In a retelling the student is not concerned with the main idea and supporting details, but is instead concerned with the content as a whole....
    • Page 31

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    • 26 Step 2. Second, after the PALS 1-3 and text retells rubrics were administered to study participants, whole-group lessons were taught on the differences between narrative and expository text. These lessons were important because the participants...
    • Page 38

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    • 33 Multiple methods group. Because of the incorporating of vocabulary, text features, and text structure, this instructional strategy was a little more complex. To not overwhelm the participants with three separate graphic organizers, the...
    • Page 23

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 24 Civilization Origins – Southern: African One of the most effective ways to cause teaching to become relevant to students is to link different texts together as parallels. One way to do this is to compare...
    • Page 28

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 29 Chapter 3 – Methodology The purpose of this creative research project was to design, develop, and evaluate a sixteen lesson unit on Greek mythology (with a technology focus) for use with tenth grade...
    • Page 41

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    • 35 which is understandable because the items come from the same testing pool. In Tables 3 and 5, the variable names for the pretests are LARITF10 (LAnguage Rasch unIT Fall 2010) and MTRITF10 (Math Rasch unIT Fall 2010). The variable names for the...
    • Page 46

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    • 40 size (ηp2 = .049) indicates low educational significance, accounting for only 5% of the shared variance. The difference between means (8.97) for the ELL and non-ELL groups was significant (p = .004), in favor of the non-ELLs, but the effect size...
    • Page 27

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    • 20 which is first, Prewrite; second, Write; third, Revise; fourth, Edit; and finally, Publish. As paradigms shifted, “The writing process was at the heart of the student-centered composition class, where the product was de-emphasized, along with a...
    • Page 75

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    • 68 Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education. Retrieved from: http://www.all4ed.org/files/WritingNext.pdf. Harris, R. (1963). Research in the teaching of English. English Journal, 2(1), 5-13. Hillocks, G. (1975). Observing and writing....
    • Page 25

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    • 19 stepping, chanting and clapping as they read. After the kinesthetic exercise, students wrote a small paragraph that showed their comprehension of the reading (Peebles, 2007). Ms. Peebles is also an advocate for reader’s theater, which encourages...
    • Page 16

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    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 17 A. Use short sentences and paragraphs B. Use design elements like spacing and dividing lines to distinguish the content sections from one another C. Use bold typeface and sub-headers to make certain words stand out D. Use...
    • Page 27

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    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 28 Fleming, N. (2001). VARK -- A guide to learning styles. VARK -- A Guide to Learning Styles. Retrieved from http://www.vark-learn.com/. Garside, C. & Edwards, K. (1996). Teaching communication theories: An experiential...

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