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    • Page 218

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    • May 1 2 , 1 9 1 9 . . .Votes were canvassed on the special water bond election held May 6 , 1 9 1 9 . There were 88 ballots c a s t , of which 88 were 'for' the issue of bonds, and 'none' ballots 'against'. May 1 6 , 1 9 1 9 . . .From Iron County...
    • Page 73

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    • think you know more than those that are placed above you which is wrong, and you must humble yourselves and be united."18 Some of the settlers were beginning to plant turnips, beets, onions, radishes, and lettuce in their gardens. Their domestic...
    • Page 148

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    • bread. The night was cold, especially since "some of the boys had neither coat nor vest." The next morning, after they had traveled about seven miles, they found the thieve's campfire, which was still burning. It wasn't long before they caught up...
    • Page 284

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    • sex of the telegrapher at the place we had left in the morning, when Mrs. Lunt remarked to her sister-wife that 'Parowan has been c d e d by St. George three times without answering. She will go to meeting!' Mr. Lunt did what he could to help, poor...
    • Page 343

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    • Marshals who desired us for practicing the Laws of Heaven, 1can say that the first 10 days were the most severe of any winter 1 ever experienced. The latter part was wamer, altogether we got aiong pretty well and feel to thank the Lord for his p r...
    • Page 351

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    • another grand occasion, and victory for the L.D. Saints, and it fills every faithful member of the church with joy and gladness and makes us feel to shout, 'Glory Hallelujah' to God & the Lamb. Aunt Ellen writes me that Hairietta has got another...
    • Page 352

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    • Florence left on the stage this a.m. for St. George for a few days visit. Thought an out would be beneficial, as she has worked pretty hard. Aunt Ellen has been quite sick since in the rniddle of the night so 1 had to come home [from being with...
    • Page 395

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    • probably drove the cows aiong with them. Heaton commented that "the eight miles seerned like 800 on that old rough wagon going up that canyon." Sarah and her children were constantly on the lookout for Indians in view of what had happened to the...
    • Page 398

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    • very d a r . We are bound to stay now, as we could not raise means to come back. We ail write with kind love to you and Jane and the dear children, and are very glad to hear of your prosperity. Your affiectionate Father, Henry Lunt Henry virote the...
    • Page 399

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    • and potatoes and sometimes oats. Potatoes are worth two cents a pound and com the same, shelled. Flour has been 5 dollars a hundred but has just rose to 5.25. We have been remarkably blessed so far as we have pretty near enough breadstuff, conuneal...
    • Page 403

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    • ofthe older boys had diEerent memones of living and working at the "Spencer Ranch." Heaton remembered the following: Corrales was about 2 miles south of Pacheco. Corrales is Spanish for 'corrais.' The Mexican people named it this because, when they...
    • Page 421

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    • 1 arn informed by good authority that the railroad running fiom El Paso to Casas Grandes is going to be extended to the river, Piedras Verde, on to the Sierra Madre Mountains on which we are located and will open up rnany valuable locaiities for...
    • Page 446

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    • Heaton's wife were ordered to fix a meal for them. They also demanded that Heaton haul a load of corn fiom the bam down to the house to feed their horses. It was fortunate, at the time, that they had a good supply of food on hand so the women fixed...
    • Page 455

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    • my new house, and the first thing they did was to find it. They tried to scare us into giving them more stuff Anyway, we finally got rid of them and they camped that night just over the hill from us. We kept our saddle horses hid out in the...
    • Page 471

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    • Stevens sent a Mexican in the mountains with some burrows after vegetables, and the rebels caught him and pretty nearly beat him to death, so you can see how conditions are in the mountains. September 29: 1 have just retumed from the stockyards....
    • Chapter 2 - Page 5

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    • Brief hiatmy of Thumna Jones and his convel-siox to L.D.S. Church, after which he comer to .America. Brief history of Sage 'Trcharne and hrr family joining I,.D.S. church and sailing to America. An account of the stay at Kanesville or Council...
    • Page 34

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    • made hats for the boys out of round pieces of felt, flared out at the bottom and pointed at the top. A trip to Salt Lake City by wagon was a tremendous undertaking for a woman alone, and six sniall children. 'l'here were probably other people...
    • Page 38

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    • mons in Utah and the law-disdaining wild western inhabitants of Nevada. However, they wcre mutually dependent on each other in a very real and vital way. 'l'rading was a necessity to both. The only available market of the southern Utah settlenients...

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