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  • All fields: policies
(182 results)



Display: 20

    • 1956_001 50

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    • ... Dept. B. A. B. A. B. A. B. A . No. •. . • •. .. • 26 . ........ 28 ...... 11-12 . . ....... 30 CEDAR CITY, UTAH SOPHOMORE YEAR Title of Course Acctg. Business Administration . . . . . . 5 Business Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Business...
    • Page 34

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    • 0 u T s T A N D I N G @!)ames <§.@P)omns c-7':. his year marks the first year that this award is being given to '(fJ recognize outstanding scholarly effort by a faculty member. Professor James E. Bowns, professor of forestry and range management,...
    • 1957 10

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    • 10 STANDING COMMITTEES The director of the college is ex-officio member of all committees. In each case the first person listed is chairman of the committee. Academic Standards: Hardy, Reeves, Osborne, Ashcroft, Plummer, Robb. Adult Education: C....
    • Page 14

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    • 11 Service learning helps promote both intellectual and civic engagement by linking the work students do in the classroom to real-world problems and real-world needs. Without compromising academic rigor or discipline-specific objectives, service...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 student attitudes regarding the homework, and lack of time to prepare effective assignments. Students simply do not like homework. The time homework requires, cuts into their extracurricular activities and downtime away from school. A lack of...
    • Page 15

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    • 12 regularly features service learning, students’ participation in service learning is noted on transcripts, outstanding students receive service-learning scholarships, awards and commencement regalia and faculty are eligible for grants or release...
    • 1957 13

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    • 13 6. To stress training for citizenship and for the formulation of character building ideals; also to develop a higher appreciation of culture and to acquire values that will enable one to enjoy his leisure time and his vocational interests. 7. To...
    • Page 19

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    • 13 community to display children’s work, bringing children’s artifacts from home to display at school, and sharing photographs outside the classroom (Feiler et al., 2008). In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Education’s (USDOE) Elementary...
    • Page 20

    • Teachers--Training of; Reading--Phonetic method; Utah--Education.
    • 13 enough pre-service preparation to help them when they encountered the vicissitudes of their beginning years of in-service teaching. This study drew heavily on the research efforts of others in concluding the following: (a) teachers had lots of...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 parents end up doing the bulk of the homework assignments in order to simply just get it done (Simplicio, 2005). Policies and practices that have formed consistent positive results regarding math homework are: “(a) Homework must help students to...
    • Page 21

    • Teachers--Training of; Reading--Phonetic method; Utah--Education.
    • 14 5. States did not understand the dual nature of licensing tests. 6. States continued to neglect content preparation for teachers. 7. States did not ensure that special education teachers were well prepared to teach students with disabilities. 8....
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    • 14 Physical Education Physical education is a curricular area offered in schools that provides students with physical activity instruction, health-­‐related fitness, and cognitive understanding about physical activity, thereby enabling student to ado...
    • Page 19

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    • 14 Promoting learning. Lastly, does homework promote learning (Coutts, 2004)? Vatterott (2011) found that “Both students and teachers view homework grades as rewards for working rather than as feedback about learning” (p.61). In a shift to...
    • Page 24

    • Teachers--Training of; Reading--Phonetic method; Utah--Education.
    • 17 language constructs needed to teach reading to struggling students? Second, did they understand dyslexia? Ninety-one pre-service teachers participated in the study. Demographically, there were 27 females and 1 male between the ages of 20-28...
    • Page 21

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    • 17 may be unrelated to what is going on in the classroom, there is still a lot of pressure placed on the positive results from these assessments. The assumption that something is wrong with education is based on sparse information about the...
    • Page 19

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    • 17 time-out room only reinforces undesirable behaviors. The child has associated acting out with getting out and is maintaining control of the situation (Richardson & Saxon, 2002). Another concern associated with the use of timeout procedures is...
    • Page 23

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    • 18 classroom observations, or evidence of lesson planning. Blank and Alas (2010) directed that “measures of implementation of professional development are critical to evaluation design in order to document and measure activities to reinforce and...
    • Page 21

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    • 19 school and using a well developed classroom management plan will help teachers to avoid liability issues. Teachers should be advised to develop a classroom management plan with consequences that can be administered exclusively inside the...

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