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    • Page 5

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    • 1 CHAPTER 1 Introduction -­‐ Nature of the Problem The connection between physical activity and student engagement is a heavily debated topic in the field of education. The health benefits of physical activity are well documented but the academic ben...
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    • 1 Installation of a storm sever on Main Street and entendrng it to . Altmira Avenue an 75 East Street. 2 Extensive Cat work was done in Coal Creek to widen and straighten the . channel. 3 The banks of Coal Creek were raised and reinforced with the...
    • Page 16

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    • 10 teachers give students, the better choices they will make with this knowledge. Students are watching our society grow old and obese. In order for students to not suffer the same consequences of life adults are experiencing now, they must be...
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    • 11 class discussion, they still preferred a lecture format. These researchers suggest that students still believe more knowledge will be gained by the “sage” presenting information than through other, peer-collaborative, activities. If teachers...
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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
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    • 114 Appendix B Parent/guardian letter of approval A letter was sent to the parent/guardian of Mrs. Okeson’s algebra I students on March 2, 2010. Contact information was given if the adult did not want their child participating in the creative...
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    • 116 Your child’s information will be combined with information from others taking part in the project. When I report the results of the study with others, I will write about the combined information. Your child will never be identified in any way...
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    • 12 requires more than a standardized form” (2002, p. 47). Guskey promoted portfolio development or hands-on role playing to implement learned practices. Teachers’ level of learning undoubtedly supersedes the elements of Level 1, in that despite...
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    • 13 successfully have a significantly higher community participation rate at cultural, intellectual, athletic, and artistic events (Steinkamp, 1998, 34-59). Additionally, town-gown studies suggest that community members who have benefited from a...
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    • 15 statistics were collected almost ten years ago, but further research showed little change from these figures. Several assumptions have been made about physical education benefits throughout the research. These assumptions were best summarized in t...
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    • 16 letters out of body movements, or participating in a clapping game with a partner. Energizers are a playful way to incorporate physical activity and mental stimulation into tightly packed school days (Erlauer, 2003). Most energizers can be incorpo...
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    • 17 one was taught the mathematics lesson plan using the interactive whiteboard (SMART interactive whiteboard) and virtual manipulatives to learn the mathematic objective. Once treatment group one had been given the lesson they took the post...
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    • 18 informed they would be participating in the math lesson using the traditional whiteboard and traditional, hands-on, manipulatives. Treatment group Two: Step two (this step was conducted on a Friday). Five days concluding the procedure of step...
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    • 19 teachers, the researcher then decided what core classes to teach. The core classes that students needed to graduate were English, history, math, and science. The researcher then needed to find fifteen willing students to participate in the...
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    • 20 Chapter 4 Results In this chapter, the purpose of the study and research surveys are reviewed followed by an overview of questions asked during individual interviews. Analysis is then provided with summary data. Introduction The purpose of this...
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    • 21 and paid preparation time for teachers to create online and other classroom materials that supported ELL instruction. On the university level, instructors of teacher preparation programs increased information on instructional practices for ELLs....
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    • 21 Chapter 3 Methodology Purpose The purpose of this study is to discover what elements of professional development are failing and why. Additionally, this study revealed which types of professional development many teachers in Washington County...
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    • 22 final status. It also frequently assesses progress so that slope of improvement can be quantified to indicate rate of improvement. The data produces accurate and meaningful information about levels of performance and rates of...
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    • 22 were sent home to needy families (Johnnston, 2001). The school community improved with school gardens as documented in a 2001 study by L. Thorp and C. Townsend. This study found that a school garden “reshaped school culture, creating hope,...
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    • 23 The outline of this evaluation befits this study in that it addresses all elements of professional development, ranging from the physical environment to the ultimate goal, student achievement. Qualitative data were collected in two ways....

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