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  • All fields: orientation
(117 results)



Display: 20

    • 1930_all 7

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    • OBJECTIVES OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE HENRY OBERHANSLEY Director A SCHOOL is a place in which we can get experiences and in-terpretations faster and more ac-curately than we can outside school. Our school life today furnishes op-portunities rich in...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 28 purposes for practicing polygamy. Their work gave a holistic and broadly based understanding of what life was like for people in the two fundamentalist communities in which they worked. Power Differentiation To establish the...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 30 understanding of why social inequality exists (McCall, 2005). For example, instead of focusing on gender by itself, many feminists are evaluating various biological, social and cultural categories such as gender, race,...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 32 by the dominant faction. Surrounding this dominant society there are many peripheral groups that make up the remainder of general society. Members of these muted groups are distinguished from “mainstream” culture because...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 41 acts, events, and styles, which are composed of specific symbols, symbolic form, norms, and their meanings” (Carbaugh, 2007; p 169). Carbaugh’s (2007) five modes of inquiry: theoretical, descriptive, interpretive,...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 87 One of the things that make this area special for the Fundamentalist Mormons who live there is their belief that after Jesus Christ’s resurrection, he visited the American continent and its inhabitants in a land called...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 96 is difficult for them to unite with one voice. Because traditionally studied co-cultures maintain close contact with the dominant group, it can be difficult to understand how the mainstream communication structure does not...
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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 105 Levitt, S. D., & Dubner, S. J. (2005). Freakonomics: A rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything (Revised and Expanded ed., pp. 163-188). New York, NY: William Morrow. Littlejohn, S. W., & Foss, K. A. (2011)....
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    • differences in advertisements (Diehl, Terlutter, & Weinberg, 2003; Han & Shavitt, 1994; Lee & Lim, 2008; Sotnikova, 2010). Each researcher has applied these aspects to advertising and the effect they have on the audience’s perception of an...
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    • We know cultures view gender differently and part of the reason for why they do depends on what type of culture they are: individualistic or collectivist. An individualistic culture can be described as a culture that is independent and values the...
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    • that is superior or has something better to offer than its competitors. In a collectivist culture, competition is advanced through the cooperation of products, or connections brands and products have to one another (p. 4). Gurhan-Canli and...
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    • Grunig, J. E., & Hunt, T. (1984). Managing public relations. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Grunig, J. E., & Repper, F. C. (1992). Strategic management, publics, and issues. In J. E. Grunig (Eds.), Excellence in Public Relations and...
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    • Heath, R. G., Brandt, D. & Nairn, A. (2006). Brand relationships: strengthened by emotion, weakened by attention. Journal of Advertising Research, 46(4), 410-419. Heath, R. G. & Hyder, P. (2005). Measuring the hidden power of emotive advertising....
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    • U.S. Embassy 46 Appendices APPENDIX 1 | Weekly journal entries Journal 1 1/17/09 – 1/24/09 The first thing I learned about the U.S. Embassy Brasilia is that it recognizes Brazilian holidays as well as American holidays. My first day was supposed...
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    • U.S. Embassy 71 LONDON FOR POLCOUNS EO 12958 TAGS USE TAGS! SEE HANDBOOK SUBJECT You have 42 spaces to persuade Washington readers that they should read your cable REFS Use letters if you have more than one: a) 99 State 12345; b) 99 State...
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    • STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 4 persuasively made the case that a communication failure is at least one of the basic sources underlying every organizational failure” (in Zaremba, 2006, p. 5). Statements such as those made above highlight the...
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    • STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 5 business industry as he stated in the late 1960’s, “It is quite common for an individual to seek to discover what his job or profession really entails and/or what his position is in society” (p.18). Koch (2008)...
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    • STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 7 “Although many of the policies in a handbook will be common across industries, every employer should endeavor to tailor its handbook to its own unique situation” (p. 2). Not only was information taken from outside...
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    • STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 9 has been collected for initial revisions of the handbook using a survey method which will be discussed later in this document. Once a handbook is created following Hacker’s suggested steps and sufficient revisions have...
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    • STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 10 Method A similar structure to that set forth by Hacker (2007) in the literature review was followed for this project. The creation of the handbook began with planning and gathering information, drafting, additions and...

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