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  • All fields: opportunities
(348 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 5

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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Due to the various benefits of inclusion, many school systems today are moving toward inclusion, or integrating students with disabilities into the regular education setting (Perles, 2010; Vaughn, 2007). Pupils with disabilit...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Reading is an essential tool for existence in our modern society. While some children and adults struggle with learning basic reading concepts, a common problem of reading reluctance exists in classrooms across the nation....
    • Page 6

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    • 1 Introduction In the religious classroom students interact with each other in a unique way that differs from that of a normal classroom experience. The nature of a religious course fosters an environment in which students have many opportunities...
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    • 10 (2002) suggest that students must view reading as a pleasurable activity because “children who dislike something may avoid it or give only partial attention to learning it, although they have the self-confidence to learn lessons and attempt...
    • Page 15

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    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
    • Page 18

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    • 11 engaging if they include names of students in the class. Students often benefit from creating problems for each other (Wadlington and Wadlington, 2008). Writing stories and listening to books are not the only ways an individual...
    • Page 17

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    • 11 in their first language (L1); however, this is not always the case. Cooter (2006) describes the American Idol star, Fantasia Barrino, who recently wrote a memoir entitled Life Is Not a Fairy Tale (2005) that tells of her experiences as an...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 on physical education may result in small gains in academic achievement and Grade Point Average. Observations show a positive connection between academic performance and physical activity, but not physical fitness. This meaning that a child’s phys...
    • Page 117

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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
    • Page 16

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    • 12 opportunities. Compared to motivated classmates, reluctant readers surrender into the spiraling world of low exposure to text. The implications are grave. This lack of exposure to text and the lack of fruitful reading practice on the part of...
    • Page 17

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    • 12 requires more than a standardized form” (2002, p. 47). Guskey promoted portfolio development or hands-on role playing to implement learned practices. Teachers’ level of learning undoubtedly supersedes the elements of Level 1, in that despite...
    • Page 18

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    • 12 say that educators “should understand that linguistic barriers, diverse social practices, and a multiplicity of assumptions, beliefs, and perceptions contribute to difficult discourse” (p. 353). Therefore, linking academic learning objectives to...
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    • 13 Gardening Association (Blair, 2009). School gardens surged particularly in urban school districts because researchers found that “non-White students from financially unstable backgrounds who [were] not regularly exposed to open green spaces and...
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    • 13 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING their nondisabled classmates. Furthermore, Seehorn (n.d.) points out that by being included, students will be exposed to opportunities for problem solving that will help them as they function outside of the classroom...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 purpose of the intervention was to allow the students to see the many opportunities available to them in the world if they continued their education. Pennsylvania instituted a program called Project S.H.A.R.E. This program had a 22% increase in...
    • 1909, page 13

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    • 13 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. and tools of all kinds for work in wood and metals are provided. Machines and lathes for the iron work are provided for the High School Engineering course. DOMESTIC SCIENCE. This...
    • 1908, page 13

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    • 13 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. CHAPEL EXERCISE. The necessity of ethical instruction is recognized and regular chapel exercises are conducted each week by the teachers and students. While theological creeds can not be taught in these...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 that considers the whole context of teaching interactively with interactive whiteboards. Teachers also need to consider a cross-curricular approach to using interactive whiteboards, giving more opportunities for pupil interaction with the board...
    • Page 146

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    • 136 ranging from 1 (no time spent) to 7 (all of time) rather than simple ―yes‖ or ―no‖ participation while on vacation. Furthermore, while the data collected on each of the individual variables in this study provides some value to the tourism...
    • 1910, page 14

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    • 14 be taught in these meetings, the necessity of honesty, virtue, temperance and upright attitude in all walks of life is inculcated and emphasized as the fundamentals to success in life. Besides the ethical training received, the students have...

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