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  • All fields: memorized
(25 results)



Display: 20

    • 1903, page 28

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    • 28 SOUTHERN BRANCH understanding of spoken German and a real appreciation of the literary language. Conversational exercises, dictation, talks on German life, etc., are interspersed as the occasion permits. The principles of the relationship...
    • 1904, page 26

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    • 26 SOUTHERN BRANCH GERMAN. MR. MABEY. German 1. ELEMENTARY COURSE. The object of the first year's work is to familiarize the student with German construction so far as to enable him to read easy German text without difficulty....
    • 1905, page 30

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    • 30 SOUTHERN BRANCH. tion for a systematic acquisition of vocabulary. The grammar and composition work is equivalent to that comprised in part f of Thomas's Practical German Grammar.. A number of easy texts are read and short poems memorized....
    • 1906, page 30

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    • 30 SOUTHERN BRANCH Commercial Law. This course embraces a study of the laws governing the transaction of business in the world of commerce, including a knowledge of contracts, agency, partnership, corporations, business paper, liens,...
    • 1907, page 32

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    • 32 SOUTHERN BRANCH GERMAN MR. DU PONCET German 1. ELEMENTARY COURSE. The object of the first year's work is to familiarize the student with German construction so far as to enable him to read easy German text without difficulty....
    • Page 197

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    • No pirates no princesses 192 they didn‘t get the strong foundation they might not recognize something as being wrong and fall that way and get sucked in very quickly. I: It seems to me, if you could use a word to describe it, would it be,...
    • Page 18

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    • 13 that they feel are better to spend their time. These researchers seem to make the same point: students are not going to do well on tasks that do not have value to them. Both the effects of negative attitudes and self-efficacy lead students to...
    • Page 69

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    • 62 Chapter 6 Reflection If I were to teach my sentence patterns over again, I would be more prepared to teach students the different types of phrases and clauses that they could use in the patterns because phrases and clauses are a new requirement...
    • Page 95

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    • ! 91! 15A 1-We will not lose. When competing, nothing is certain. We work really hard and do our best but sometimes there is a team that is just better, or another actor who connected more to that one judge. There are zero guarantees in theatrical...
    • Page 47

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    • CWSW 47 where the average cashier only serves one person every sixty seconds. You could also say that in the time you've worked as a cashier you have had no variances in the cash drawer; being over or short with the money. The next thing you want...
    • Page 48

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    • CWSW 48 waiting to be interviewed. Give the interviewer some examples of the skills and achievements you possess along with one or two attributes or personal characteristics. Take two minutes to write down a Power Paragraph. Finally in Zone Two and...
    • Page 50

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 46 Spanish Proficiency The following section will discuss the students’ Spanish Proficiency reflected in the Four Square Writing and Writing Assessments. The ACTFL proficiency standards were used to determine students’ proficiency levels. Students’...
    • Page 52

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 48 Figure 6 Percentage of Students at Novice Low Proficiency Level At the initial assessment, a majority of students (84%) wrote at a novice low level. This is appropriate because the end-of-year target for first graders is novice low. However, the...
    • Page 54

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 50 In Figure 8, the student is able to write memorized words and phrases and include specific information connected to the topic. The vocabulary is well understood by the student and very concrete. Most of the content is written in list...
    • Page 55

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 51 49% of the class. This happened because 39% of the students exceeded novice mid and wrote at a novice high or intermediate low level. Novice High. Students who write at the novice high level are beginning to create original content at the...
    • Page 58

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 54 Although some of the sentences in Figure 13 are simple and straightforward, others express the writer’s unique ideas. The student was able to express herself in a more abstract and individual manner than at the novice level. Subject/verb...
    • Page 68

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 64 research demonstrates, students are able to use accents in memorized sight words like “está,” “mamá,” and “papa.” In the future, it is recommended that second grade teachers focus instruction on and provide exposure to high frequency words with...
    • Page 70

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 66 incorrectly because they are spelled with a ‘gu.’ Students did not learn the ‘qu’ pattern successfully either. A majority of words written with ‘qu’ were “quiero,” “porque,” or “que.” Even though these words could have easily been memorized as...
    • Page 71

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 67 Figure 18 Students’ Incorrect Use of Vowels The vowel ‘o’ was used most accurately, followed by ‘e’ and ‘a.’ However, students frequently used the vowels ‘u’ and ‘i’ incorrectly and often replaced them with other vowels. These errors persisted...
    • Page 73

    • Spanish language; Language experience approach in education; Writing
    • 69 One of the most significant results of this study is the students’ Spanish proficiency considered in context of their L1. Students were categorized into subgroups based on how their parents answered the following questions at registration: 1....

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