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  • All fields: lunch
(107 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 78

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    • "By the later part of October 1879, the Sreater part of the pilgrims that were to make up the company booked for the San Juan Mission were on wheels headed for the Colorado River at a point east of the Escalante Desert. There were only a few in...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 Gardening Association (Blair, 2009). School gardens surged particularly in urban school districts because researchers found that “non-White students from financially unstable backgrounds who [were] not regularly exposed to open green spaces...
    • Page 13

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    • !14 baseball on the outside, though the inside was much softer, but I couldn’t find a good substitute for a bat anywhere. Finally, I settled on a PVC pipe I bought for under a dollar that was the perfect length for a bat. Minutes before the event...
    • Page 20

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    • 14 the school by using funds from the Effective Teaching and Learning Literacy Program (USDOE, 2010a). These government programs are examples of how educators and scholars are redefining literacy as the term expands into the experiences and lives...
    • Page 17

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    • 14 This initiative was funded by a variety of state agencies to link nutrition education and other studies with gardens in each of the state’s 8,000 public schools (Joseph, 2001). California created a guide to support teachers titled, “A Childs...
    • Page 18

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    • 15 care than others. Vegetable gardens, for example, will not work well in schools with climates that do not have growing seasons that coincide with the school year. School gardening covers a continuum of efforts to increase the...
    • Page 21

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    • 15 students. Unfortunately, there is a connection between the number of students who qualify for Title I services and “children who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet state academic standards” (USDOE, 2010b). Schools that have at...
    • Page 20

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    • 16 letters out of body movements, or participating in a clapping game with a partner. Energizers are a playful way to incorporate physical activity and mental stimulation into tightly packed school days (Erlauer, 2003). Most energizers can be incorpo...
    • Page 7

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    • 2 categorized as a high-poverty, Title I school, with all of the students qualifying for free lunch (B. Moser, personal communication, October 8, 2010). Research has shown that there can be positive growth in reading achievement when students, even...
    • Page 8

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    • 2 have been completely transformed and are irreversible. The ways in which ELLs from low SES backgrounds interact and associate with the digital era was also addressed. The results of this research will help educators yield a deeper appreciation...
    • Page 26

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    • 20 one in which parents may still value literacy and their children’s education; however, they are less educated and engage in fewer literacy activities in the home. Students from literacy-oriented communities have proven to be more prepared for...
    • Page 28

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    • 25 experiential learning basis, have been proposed as a method to reinforce nutrition education because youth who plant and harvest their own produce are more likely to eat it” (Beckman, Smith, 2008, p. 12). The 2008 study conducted by Beckman...
    • Page 34

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    • 30 results, however, are not presented in this order. The data below have been separated into each type activity and begins by describing the most effective type of physical activity for increasing student engagement. At the conclusion on the chapter...
    • Page 37

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    • 31 Instrumentation Questionnaires, language arts scores from end-of-level CRTs, UALPA scores, free and reduced lunch data (Title I), and ethnographic case studies were used to examine the connections between home-literacy environments and literacy...
    • Page 34

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    • 31 School 2 0 88% School 1 3.38 87% School 7 0 85% Table 1.1 represents schools, the average number of submissions on the AES program MyAccess per 8th grade student over the course of a year, and the 8th grade pass rate percentages for each school....
    • Page 38

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    • 32 perspective about the HLEs of ELLs from low-SES families. The instruments used to collect data for this study are located in Appendices A through D. The tasks that were completed in sequential order to accomplish the purpose of the...
    • Page 35

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    • 32 Table 2.1 Schools, Average Submissions, and Free/Reduced Lunch Percentages School Name Average Teacher Directed Submissions per Student Free/Reduced Lunch School 7 0 51.15% School 3 18.805 44.09% School 2 0 37.73% School 11 12.51 30.63% School...
    • Page 36

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    • 33 School 6 93% School 8 90% School 3 89% School 4 Junior High 89% School 2 88% School 10 87% School 5 87% School 1 87% School 7 Junior 85% School 11 78% In table 2.3 the schools with the lowest amount of free or reduced lunch students are listed...
    • Page 37

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    • 34 School 8 27.66% School 10 29.64% School 11 JR 30.63% School 2 JR 37.73% School 3 JR 44.09% School 7 Junior 51.15% The tables validate the belief that socio-economic status is a major contributor to student success on tests. For example, School 9...

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