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  • All fields: learning
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Display: 20

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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Disruptive student behavior in the classroom setting is a major area of concern in the field of education. Disruptive classroom behavior inhibits student learning and reduces cognitive engagement time by interrupting teacher...
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    • 2 the “greening” of schools to bring a natural environment to urban areas and supplement school meal plans with food grown on campus. Urban school gardens provided a valuable learning environment that was unusual in large cities. Rural schools...
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    • Mehta, J. (2013). Why American education fails. Foreign Affairs, 92(3), 105-116. Murray, O., & Olcese, N. (2011). Teaching and learning with iPads, ready or not?. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 55(6), 42-48....
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    • 3 controlled stratified national sample of thirty suburban school districts. Quantitative and qualitative data was gathered from suburban, public school administrators. This research did not seek data from rural, urban, or private schools. This...
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    • 45 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING willing to make the change to inclusion if they are given the necessary training to do so. I also learned that teachers haven’t been making the necessary accommodations for disabled students because they haven’t know...
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    • ethnicity, and gender: Evidence of a digital divide in Florida schools. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 45(4), 291-307. Walsh, M., & Simpson, A. (2013). Touching, tapping ... thinking? Examining the dynamic materiality of touch pad...
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    • STRENGTH TRAINING ON DANCERS’ JUMP AND BALANCE 7 participated in strength training programs while others have never lifted a weight. The maturation of each participant was an additional limitation because each athlete was at a different point...
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    • 41 are working. The children speak Spanish to their parents, and both English and Spanish to each other. While the interview is conducted in Spanish with the mom, she mentioned that she is learning English from her children and likes to practice...
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    • 3 will be required. This stage would require written permission from the target student's parents in order to conduct an evaluation, which would determine whether or not the student has a conduct disorder qualifying him/her for special education...
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    • 46 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING References Ammer, J.J. (1984). The mechanics of mainstreaming: considering the regular educators’ perspective. Remedial and Special Education, 5(6), 15-­‐20. Blenk, K., & Fine, D.L. (1995). Making school inclusion wo...
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    • KUDZU Leadership 71 portion of the presentation, while only one mentioned the Motivation-Hygiene Theory and employee morale. It might be significant that responses regarding positive feelings about each main section were more positive for the first...
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    • MINDSETS AND YOUNG STUDENTS 53 Dealing with frustration Goal: To help students understand that failing and getting frustrated are an important part of learning and learning how to persist. I. Discuss how frustration, hard work, worry, sadness, and...
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    • 4 Another purpose of this study was to better involve parents in the decision-making concerning discipline measures taken when assisting target students. Research has shown, “students whose parents are involved in their education often show...
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    • 5 Chapter 2 Review of Literature Introduction The purpose of this literature review was to examine the history, review the types, discuss the benefits, and analyze the barriers to school gardens. Many important considerations were summarized from...
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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 94 forgotten or ignored. Nevertheless, because receptionists observe so much of doctors’ work, as well as the attitudes and emotions associated with those work efforts, receptionists have an interesting angle when it comes to...
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    • 6 to explore, and a chance to manipulate their surroundings, children [became] less aggressive and more ready to learn” (Coffee, 1999, p. 37). Furthermore Coffee found that as students took ownership of their environment, “especially to nurture...

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