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  • All fields: interact
(103 results)



Display: 20

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    • 1 Introduction In the religious classroom students interact with each other in a unique way that differs from that of a normal classroom experience. The nature of a religious course fosters an environment in which students have many opportunities...
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    • 10 deprived of learning because of their social isolation and lack of interaction, which affected their overall cognitive functioning. As a result, Vygotsky set out to transform education in Russia by creating new pedagogical styles that would...
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    • 12 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Social Skills According to McCarty (2006), the fact that students with disabilities can be joined socially with their peers is one of the greatest benefits. As disabled students are included in the regular classroom,...
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    • 12 say that educators “should understand that linguistic barriers, diverse social practices, and a multiplicity of assumptions, beliefs, and perceptions contribute to difficult discourse” (p. 353). Therefore, linking academic learning...
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    • 2 have been completely transformed and are irreversible. The ways in which ELLs from low SES backgrounds interact and associate with the digital era was also addressed. The results of this research will help educators yield a deeper appreciation...
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    • 20 one in which parents may still value literacy and their children’s education; however, they are less educated and engage in fewer literacy activities in the home. Students from literacy-oriented communities have proven to be more prepared for...
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    • 22 can be aided through imagination exercises. They could be given long-term projects with various stages that need to be checked before moving onto the next. This will help the student strengthen their abilities of patience and procedure. These...
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    • !24 interacted with me, they might adjust their behaviors to be more in line with whatever they thought I might want. My observations spanned mid-August to early-December. During this period, my journaling yielded many interactions from a host of...
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    • !25 method of auto-ethnography. From a broad perspective, ethnography is a form of research method that allows the researcher to be far more engaged in the research than other methods of gathering data. Given that my research required me to...
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    • 26 admissions. However, missing from the equation of research and information is the perspective of the students being targeted. It’s fine to see that there is a growing trend of social media within higher education, but has that growing trend...
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    • 29 reduce barriers. Teachers who were familiar with maintenance people were able to solicit their input for planting opportunities (Coffee & Rivkin,1998). An obtained copy of the physical plans for schools helped to avoid utility lines and other...
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    • 31 The researcher determined these standards were well developed and focused on many Core concepts which were necessary for students to gain understanding in preparation for further study in chemistry. This determination came after an extensive...
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    • 33 • Students will understand what matter consists of and how to identify different interactions and the changes matter undergoes. • Students will understand the importance of electrons and how they are arranged and be able to utilize this...
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    • 35 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY Text Wilbraham, A. C., Staley, D. D., Matta, M. S., & Waterman, E. L. (2008). Chemistry. Boston, MA: Pearson Prentice Hall. Prerequisite Algebra I Course Description Chemistry is an organized method of science that...
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    • !36 more in those four months than in all our marriage combined, and I know for a fact that the lack of privacy was a major cause. Fortunately, we learned how to adjust to each other and altered the way we interacted with one other, and this helped...
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    • 43 of the entire text being read was 7.17 out of 10. Students rated the validity, effectiveness, and accuracy of the test at 7.42, with the same number reflecting their agreement of the test results. They comprehended the texts at a high level...
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    • 44 completely ignored, but the question is where and how can higher education use it to be most effective. The survey questions did not address current, if any, interaction from colleges or universities. Perhaps the students are not receiving...
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    • 45 something or someone on Facebook, or on other social media sites for that matter, is intriguing. Determining a common reason for these decisions could help increase connections to high school students through social media. On the note of...
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    • 47 Table 4.8 DRP Post Survey Results – Group S Post-Survey GROUP S - DRP Student Number 1. Confidence in reading skills and comprehension 2. Before the test, seriousness about taking test 3. After the test, seriousness of taking test 4. Did you...
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    • 48 Table 4.9 DRP Post Survey Results – Group M Post-Survey Group M - DRP Student Number 1. Confidence in reading skills and comprehension 2. Before the test, seriousness about taking test 3. After the test, seriousness of taking test 4. Did you...

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