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  • All fields: improved
(256 results)



Display: 20

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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Recently there has been strong scientific evidence pointing to a potential link between the mind and the body, suggesting improved cognitive results when movement is added to the learning process (Jensen, 2005). However,...
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    • 10 improved system that allowed the resort to maintain and develop its resources to improve future functions rather than continually programming activities that were of little or no interest to guests. I created a training binder of Summit Watch...
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    • 10 physical activity throughout the day tend to show increased brain function, higher concentration levels, higher energy levels, increases self-­‐esteem and better behavior which may all support cognitive learning (Cocke, 2002). This increase in cog...
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    • 10 Student Achievement Through the use of InteractiveWhiteboards Through proper professional development trainings and willingness of educators to alter their teaching style, there has been a continuous pattern of how interactive whiteboards have...
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    • 12 Under conditions calculated to increase math anxiety in females, males tended to overwhelmingly outperform females (Beilock, 2008). However, both males and females can be negatively affected by math anxiety. In another study, after being given a...
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    • 13 oral language, and potentially positive effects for early reading, writing, and knowledge of print (Institute of Education Sciences, 2006). Ideally, intervention would come for low SES Hispanic ELLs when they are very young, but this is...
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    • 13 students with a deep understanding of a selection of text, improved skills in comprehension, vocabulary, listening, speaking, and critical thinking, and experience in working together to construct meaning, solve problems, and explore life...
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    • 130 Hypothesis 6 predicted that travel motive has a positive effect on visiting intention and was supported with a coefficient of 0.138; supporting results of the previous study conducted by McCartney, Butler and Bennett (2008). A strong...
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    • 14 Even though there are problems with the current standardized testing program, other problems would likely surface without the use of them. Some of the possible consequences of eliminating standardized testing would be that high schools would...
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    • 15 need to be developed so that they provide new ways to assess the non-cognitive skills that students need to succeed in college and in the workplace. Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) proposes that a growth-based evaluation be included into...
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    • 15 students that had previously given up to learn what was necessary to graduate and move on with their lives. The teachers were a key factor to allowing the curriculum to work for the student and discover alternatives for making learning work. One...
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    • 15 understanding. Foldables encourage “reading, writing, thinking, organizing data, researching, and other communication skills into an interdisciplinary mathematics curriculum” (Zike, n.d., p. iv). Foldables can be used to implement other types of...
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    • 16 promoting daily environmental learning” (Blair, 2009, p. 34). A 2000 study conducted in Florida concluded that “students in all types of gardens had high responsibility scores, indicating that all students possessed a sense of responsibility”...
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    • 17 can help educators guide instruction for all of the students in their charge. Assessments should be useful, meaningful, informative, and educative. They must capture and communicate judgments about student work and show students how to be better...
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    • 17 Currently, energizer programs are being designed by teachers to integrate physical activity into the academic curriculum. One example is the Take 10! Program. Take 10! is a classroom-­‐based physical activity program designed by the International...
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    • 18 from learning with dance was the improvement that the school children exhibited on standardized tests in all areas. When compared with schools of similar socio-economic status, the “Minds in Motion” school had much higher test scores. The...
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    • 18 • The degree of repetition of topics (U.S. curriculum was highly repetitive; topics were introduced too early, taught with too little depth, and were endlessly repeated). • Logical order of topics (topics in U.S. were not presented in a logical,...
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    • 19 nature and environmental issues and relationships (Garcia-Ruiz, 2009, p. 34). “Personal experience and observation of nature [were] the building blocks for classroom enrichment. Gardens ground[ed] children in growth, and decay, predator-prey...
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    • 2 contrary—highly enthusiastic, yet fail to successfully incorporate new knowledge or skills into their curriculums. Background, Significance, Purpose and Study Setting As more and more districts, and most specifically teachers, feel the pressures...
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    • 2 Opponents say it “diminishes the role of teachers and warps students’ notions of good writing” (Grimes, & Warschauer, 2010). The Conference on College Composition and Communication stated: Writing-to-a-machine violates the essentially social...

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