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  • All fields: improved
(169 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 14

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    • 10 physical activity throughout the day tend to show increased brain function, higher concentration levels, higher energy levels, increases self-­‐esteem and better behavior which may all support cognitive learning (Cocke, 2002). This increase in...
    • Page 18

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    • 13 oral language, and potentially positive effects for early reading, writing, and knowledge of print (Institute of Education Sciences, 2006). Ideally, intervention would come for low SES Hispanic ELLs when they are very young, but this is...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 students with a deep understanding of a selection of text, improved skills in comprehension, vocabulary, listening, speaking, and critical thinking, and experience in working together to construct meaning, solve problems, and explore life...
    • Page 140

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    • 130 Hypothesis 6 predicted that travel motive has a positive effect on visiting intention and was supported with a coefficient of 0.138; supporting results of the previous study conducted by McCartney, Butler and Bennett (2008). A strong...
    • Page 22

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    • 15 understanding. Foldables encourage “reading, writing, thinking, organizing data, researching, and other communication skills into an interdisciplinary mathematics curriculum” (Zike, n.d., p. iv). Foldables can be used to implement other...
    • Page 19

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    • 16 promoting daily environmental learning” (Blair, 2009, p. 34). A 2000 study conducted in Florida concluded that “students in all types of gardens had high responsibility scores, indicating that all students possessed a sense of...
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    • 17 Currently, energizer programs are being designed by teachers to integrate physical activity into the academic curriculum. One example is the Take 10! Program. Take 10! is a classroom-­‐based physical activity program designed by the Internation...
    • Page 22

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    • 18 • The degree of repetition of topics (U.S. curriculum was highly repetitive; topics were introduced too early, taught with too little depth, and were endlessly repeated). • Logical order of topics (topics in U.S. were not presented in a...
    • Page 22

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    • 19 nature and environmental issues and relationships (Garcia-Ruiz, 2009, p. 34). “Personal experience and observation of nature [were] the building blocks for classroom enrichment. Gardens ground[ed] children in growth, and decay, predator-prey...
    • Page 7

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    • 2 contrary—highly enthusiastic, yet fail to successfully incorporate new knowledge or skills into their curriculums. Background, Significance, Purpose and Study Setting As more and more districts, and most specifically teachers, feel the...
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    • 2 Opponents say it “diminishes the role of teachers and warps students’ notions of good writing” (Grimes, & Warschauer, 2010). The Conference on College Composition and Communication stated: Writing-to-a-machine violates the essentially...
    • Page 24

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    • 21 A 2005 study of fifth graders across three inner city Baton Rouge schools conducted by, J.L. Smith and C.E. Mostenbocjer, found that gardens in the school correlated with a higher achievement in science (Blair, 2009, p. 23). In a separate...
    • Page 26

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    • 21 and paid preparation time for teachers to create online and other classroom materials that supported ELL instruction. On the university level, instructors of teacher preparation programs increased information on instructional practices for ELLs....
    • Page 23

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    • 21 This process of data-based decision making will allow teachers to more effectively determine the appropriate method of instruction or intervention on an individualized and/or classroom basis. Parent Involvement The National PTA found support for...
    • Page 26

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    • 22 There are many trends found throughout all of these previous studies. First, decreasing or eliminating time for physical activity in order to accommodate for other academic subjects will not lead to improved student achievement. Second, increasing...
    • Page 25

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    • 22 were sent home to needy families (Johnnston, 2001). The school community improved with school gardens as documented in a 2001 study by L. Thorp and C. Townsend. This study found that a school garden “reshaped school culture, creating hope,...
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    • 23 The outline of this evaluation befits this study in that it addresses all elements of professional development, ranging from the physical environment to the ultimate goal, student achievement. Qualitative data were collected in two ways....
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    • 23 There has been interesting research regarding AES systems and revision. It is widely accepted that developing good writers involves revision. In fact, in a 3-year study, covering 3 school district in the state of California, it was found that...
    • Page 30

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    • 25 Anonymous student test scores are public information and were obtained from the Utah State Office of Education’s COGNOS site. Teacher’s individual identification numbers were released to the primary investigator on signed consent...

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