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    • Page 447

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    • t h e citizens early in February. Carried. Feb. 7 , 1980.. . T h e Re-Development Agency ordinance was approved. Members of the Committee a r e : Dixie Leavitt, Harold Hiskey. Conrad Hatch, Charlotte Boyer, Elloyd Marchant, and Clair Morris. Feb....
    • Page 83

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    • caprice of their savage nature which, through causes unknown to us, may at any moment become excited and arrayed against us. Let us then be wise and avoid every measure that gives them any advantage over us. To those brethren who have gone from the...
    • Page 322

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    • with the poiiticians in Congress. When the excitement ends, we can talk to them. We do not wish to place ourselves in a state of antagonism, nor act defiantly toward this Govenunent. We will fulfill the letter, so far as practicable, of that...
    • Lambs, Grand Champion, 1950

    • Sheep; Livestock; Southwest Utah Livestock Show--Cedar City (Iron County, Utah)
    • Grand Champion lamb. Owner, Gary Adams of Tremonton. Purchaser, Lehi Jones of Jones Implement Company. The lamb hit one of the highest marks in the state when the animal brought $3.00 per pound in the auction ring.
    • Page 21

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    • 15 students. Unfortunately, there is a connection between the number of students who qualify for Title I services and “children who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet state academic standards” (USDOE, 2010b). Schools that have at...
    • Page 62

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    • 56 interventions for ELLs with low literacy scores is another way this research has been applied to the learning environment of the classroom to increase literacy experiences. When children interact with multi-literacies, there are high levels of...
    • Page 43

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    • 39 Chapter 5 Discussion This project was implemented in the researchers’ sixth grade math class in hopes of devising a structured remedy in aiding those students who receive insufficient help from home on daily math concepts. The researcher...
    • Page 19

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    • 13 Mattos, & Weber, 2009, p. 28). Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, and Young (2003) prefer standard protocol because “everyone knows what to implement, and it is easier to train practitioners to conduct an intervention correctly and to assess the accuracy of...
    • Page 23

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    • 17 reading” (p. 283). They continue to explain “the assessments should be sufficiently sensitive to small changes in the student’s reading performance” (Mesmer & Mesmer, 2008, p. 283). Besides indicating student growth, progress monitoring...
    • Page 25

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    • 19 2003). In addition to improving the core academic instruction, by working together, educators will have the opportunity to focus on instruction and monitoring students’ response to accurately determine those in need of special education...
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    • 20 Students Who Benefit from RTI Kamps et al. (2007) compared the effects of English language learners (ELL) receiving Tier 2 interventions to ELL students being taught using a balanced literacy approach to reading. The study found students...
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    • 22 Concerns for the Success of RTI Understanding and integration of scientific research is a requirement for good instruction using the RTI format. For this reason, it is imperative teachers not only have strong background in research but also have...
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    • 24 Perceptions of Teachers Concerning RTI In their study, Greenfield et al. (2010) found that teachers in their first year of school-wide RTI implementation used progress monitoring more strategically and became more confident in using the data...
    • Page 33

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    • 27 to an hour or less. To form a baseline of information concerning teachers’ overall understanding of the RTI framework, the researcher began with interview questions created by Terry Ann Paradis (2011) from her dissertation. The questions were...
    • Page 40

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    • 34 through monthly notes giving the number of lessons attended, reading level of student, rate and accuracy, and any other relevant comments. Teachers, along with colleagues in the school teaching the same grade level, special educators, speech...
    • Page 41

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    • 35 placement did not involve much teacher input. Teachers were told when students would receive interventions. Table 1 Respondent Answers Related to Teacher Input Question Number 3 Similar Responses 2 Similar Responses Divergent Responses 1 √ 2...
    • Page 53

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    • 47 Stress is a part of every teacher’s life. The participants in this study identified many factors adding stress to their lives. One teacher mentioned the expectation to have all students reading on benchmark and the challenge of uncooperative...
    • Page 54

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    • 48 implement new programs every year. One teacher said her greatest barrier was there was not enough of her to go around to help all of the students all of the time. Table 5 represents teachers responses related to RTI’s effect on teaching. Table...
    • Page 63

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    • 57 and student learning. As Hall (2008) points out, “a major impediment to full implementation of RTI occurs when teachers have the data but don’t know how to analyze them” (p. 5). Hall (2008) goes on to add, “Far too often schools that...

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