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    • Page 447

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    • t h e citizens early in February. Carried. Feb. 7 , 1980.. . T h e Re-Development Agency ordinance was approved. Members of the Committee a r e : Dixie Leavitt, Harold Hiskey. Conrad Hatch, Charlotte Boyer, Elloyd Marchant, and Clair Morris. Feb....
    • Page 83

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    • caprice of their savage nature which, through causes unknown to us, may at any moment become excited and arrayed against us. Let us then be wise and avoid every measure that gives them any advantage over us. To those brethren who have gone from the...
    • Page 322

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    • with the poiiticians in Congress. When the excitement ends, we can talk to them. We do not wish to place ourselves in a state of antagonism, nor act defiantly toward this Govenunent. We will fulfill the letter, so far as practicable, of that...
    • Page 22

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    • how to implement and use iPads on a daily basis with an assigned coach. The third step has the coaches work with the teacher throughout the year (Krzystowczyk , 2013). Another idea for helping teaches begin to set up curriculum using technology is...
    • Page 30

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    • Results: As illustrated in Figure 8, half of the responding students reported that they would write with their iPad if given a choice. As shown in Figures 5 and 6, half of the teachers feel that they have not been given enough training, and 100%...
    • Page 43

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    • handwrite, and why they do or do not feel they write better with their iPad. This could be due to lack of teacher training on how to implement iPads into the curriculum (Figure 6) or difficulty typing on a small computer. Social media New...
    • Page 68

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    • From your observations, do students write better quality (fewer errors, address the topic better) with iPads or handwritten? Why? Student's in general have fewer errors and writing is more legible using iPads. About equal. My 7th graders make more...
    • Page 18

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    • 12 yearly progress. NCLB requires that ELLs be included in state yearly assessments for accountability purposes. Reasonable accommodations must be made for assessments administered to these students. Each state sets their own model for identifying...
    • Page 24

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    • 18 the success of instruction and educational programs. If districts, schools, and educators are to successfully close the achievement gap they must implement effective interventions. Strategies that have been helpful in closing the achievement gap...
    • Page 28

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    • 22 final status. It also frequently assesses progress so that slope of improvement can be quantified to indicate rate of improvement. The data produces accurate and meaningful information about levels of performance and rates of...
    • Page 11

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    • 4 Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CCSS, http://www.corestandards.org, 2011). After the Utah State Office of Education presented this new curriculum manual...
    • Page 16

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    • 9 desired career and college readiness results. Some view this gap as an opportunity for teachers to maintain freedom to develop individual and creative lessons. In order to achieve success, though, a strong and concise understanding of what and...
    • Page 60

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    • 53 and more frequently than the other sentences (except for Simple sentences, of course). This could also have been the result of the teacher feeling more confident with Compound sentences than with the other two more complex patterns as well;...
    • Page 24

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    • 18 to consider multiple intelligences, unique goals of this learner, specific concerns about this learner, content demands, and how the students are going to communicate with the teacher they have mastered the concept (Ellis, Lieberman & LeRoux,...
    • Page 60

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    • 54 esteem were known to exhibit. Instructors that implement individual testing and evaluations increase the chance that their students will lead a healthy life. Differentiated instruction in physical education does make a significant difference to...
    • Page 41

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 34 the impact of social emotional interventions on students’ academic success. Finally, the House Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth, and Families (2000) provided testimonial support for character education’s...
    • Page 83

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 76 was outrageous.” Another concurred, “Training with Covey was extremely expensive and I’m not sure we couldn’t have done the same thing by reading the books!”1 Additionally, one adult complained about the...
    • Page 107

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 100 fifth graders vs. third, fourth and fifth graders), the results cannot be directly correlated. Yet, the similarity in results supports the notion that students at this school perceived that they knew TLIM...
    • Page 116

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 109 principal would use TLIM program in a future classroom/school even if the school were not implementing the program. Questions 10 and 11 were free-response questions about what the teachers and principal did...

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