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    • Page 14

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    • 10 are able to make “annual growth” in the first few years of school, they will not become further behind others, but they still will be unable to reach appropriate benchmarks. Research indicates that, although data vary from state to state,...
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    • 10 fueled considerable anxiety around school board members and administrators, many of who had farm or small town backgrounds. Enthusiastic supporters were drawn to the promise of school gardens not only as a way to better implement nature study...
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    • 10 philosophy that educators can recognize signs that indicate a potential for inappropriate behavior (Murdick, 1996). It is preferable to prevent inappropriate behaviors rather than wait until after the behaviors occur before responding. Students...
    • Page 112

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    • 105 Chapter 6 Reflection I discovered through interviews that the majority of the students involved in the creative project preferred working in groups. Allowing students to choose the group members exhibited excitement. Explaining the assignments...
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    • 106 Learning in detail about the different learning styles created by Howard Gardner increased my desire to implement the strategies that have been proven to help students learn to the best of their abilities. Even though at times I feel frustrated...
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    • 11 In a research study conducted by O’Connor et al. (2000), a group of kindergarteners’ literacy progress was monitored and tracked over two years. During this time, students who were considered “at-risk” were given four tiers of...
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    • 11 Sherman 2008). Much of classroom disruptions are attributed to students struggling to combat ADHD; a great deal of disruptions could be reduced or even eliminated by implementing preventative approaches. A preventative outlook involves the...
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    • 110 Chapter 7 HTML XHTML attempts to support all the rules of HTML using XHTML standards. If this all sounds confusing, don’t let it worry you. By learning HTML, you are also learning the basics of XHTML. There are some differ-ences but they are...
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    • 13 Mattos, & Weber, 2009, p. 28). Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, and Young (2003) prefer standard protocol because “everyone knows what to implement, and it is easier to train practitioners to conduct an intervention correctly and to assess the accuracy of...
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    • 15 1986, 93). Service learning is one of the ways in which we maximize the benefits that students receive from our nation’s universities. However, in order for service-learning to be successful, it is essential for three specific criteria to be...
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    • 15 Inclusion is the least restrictive of the four timeout procedures. Inclusion involves placing a student in a separate area inside the classroom where instruction can be observed, but where interaction with peers is denied for a given period of...
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    • 15 students. Unfortunately, there is a connection between the number of students who qualify for Title I services and “children who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet state academic standards” (USDOE, 2010b). Schools that have at...
    • Page 22

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    • 15 understanding. Foldables encourage “reading, writing, thinking, organizing data, researching, and other communication skills into an interdisciplinary mathematics curriculum” (Zike, n.d., p. iv). Foldables can be used to implement other...
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    • 16 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING disabilities. Research has found that as educators gain experience and training, their attitudes become more positive (Villa, Thousand, Meyers, & Nevin, 1996). Low Expectations Low expectations are another barrier to...
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    • 16 strive to more consistently implement alternate behavior interventions that are less intrusive, and likely more effective. The use of exclusionary timeout should be used only as a last resort when less restrictive interventions have...
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    • 17 reading” (p. 283). They continue to explain “the assessments should be sufficiently sensitive to small changes in the student’s reading performance” (Mesmer & Mesmer, 2008, p. 283). Besides indicating student growth, progress monitoring...
    • Page 185

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    • 172 Chapter 9 Adobe Dreamweaver and add the content that you need for each page. You do not have to use the same template for all the pages but you should strive for some degree of consistency so your web site is easier to navi-gate. Also remember...
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    • 18 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Funding formulas structured to chastise schools that implement inclusion are a major barrier (Seehorn, n.d.). If there is more money available for students being served in the special education setting, then school d...
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    • 18 negative, that child’s awareness of contingencies affecting their own behavior is increased (Appolloni, Cooke & Strain, 1976). In some instances, student removal from the classroom and placement in a less stimulating environment such as a...
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    • 19 2.6 Digital forensics Laboratory Digital forensics laboratory plays a big role in the development of digital forensics training in current higher education. Practical training will assist digital forensics students to understand in depth about...

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