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  • All fields: horses
(400 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 151

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    • retaliation. They never forgot an injury or an injustice. In other words, they subscribed to the worn out code of an "eye for an eye and a life for a life." With them the punishment of crime was a personal, rather than a public, matter. There was...
    • Page 130

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    • building) But, this was not all. When the teacher's payroll was submitted to the state for payment the latter part of December, the Attorney General ruled that the conditions had not been complied with and the Ward Hall did not meet the...
    • Page 131

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    • lose their lives, than not. They decided to get out while they could. They loaded a little of the already sawed lumber onto the outfits and started back. They stopped for the night in a grove of pines near the Upper Mammoth. By morning, the snow...
    • Page 409

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    • down. We took the cheese vat out and made the cheese house for a living room for mother and put the stove i the 'lean-to.' We had a room back of this we n called a saddle house and this, the boys slept in, but some of us went to the barn to sleep....
    • Page 157

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    • Some communities complied, some did not. Since Cedar City was so far away from the open fighting it seemed somewhat extreme to send their cattle to Salt Lake City, especially since acquiring livestock had taken a great effort and the settlers...
    • Page 136

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    • the Perry country and finally reached the herd. Walt Cox was herding the sheep at that time and he was in bed asleep when Henry arrived so Henry hobbled his horse out and woke the herder long enough to tell him they would have to get up early the...
    • Page 159

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    • interest in occupying the new Town Plot. Later in the season a large influx of immigrants from thenorth came in. We were now nearly 1,000 strong--men, women, and children3'*" There were only twelve white casualties of the Walker War. None of these...
    • Page 414

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    • this far off land of Mexico and separated from so many of our family that we so dearly love, which are separated f?om [us] by such a long distance. But, this life is short at the longest and the generation to which 1 belong wiii soon al1 be passed...
    • 1899, Jun 6

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    • Tues. June 6, 1899: Ther. warm┬║., Wea. clouded up in evening. We made ditch till 3 pm. grubbed a little brush after. Father and Alonzo Russell came out from home over the Bend. Wednesday 7: Ther. warm┬║., Wea. clouds going east. Jake & I took 36...
    • Page 10

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    • 70 Three Score and Ten in Retrospect medicine." It was 50 yards down the hill, so Dad started his arms swinging like a windmill at the top of the hill. By the time he got to the bottom, going about 50 mph at his own estimate, he hit the kid like a...
    • Page 147

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    • rock had to he heated by fires in order to break it more easily. Dirt and other material had to he carried to cover the rock that couldn't be hroken. Pretty soon Mr. Parry told Henry he thought he would sooner walk. Henry thought that was pretty...
    • Page 148

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    • Everyone in the Jones family worked hard because it was a necessity. Henrietta was no exception, she could drive four horses as good as any man. When the family moved to town from 3-Creeks in the fall of 1904, school had started. Will was the only...
    • 1914, Jan 17

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    • Sat. Jan. 17, 1914: Ther. Cool Wea. Cloudy I went to the flanigan field and drove some horses out then went on to town this afternoon. Sunday 18: Ther. Colder. Wea. Cloudy at home with Mary most all day.
    • Page 173

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    • For&unately, only one mule was Med, but it took a full day to recover the baggage. The crossing of the east fork of the Colorado River was attended with much difficulty and more danger. Steadily the expedition's food supply dwindled and couldn't be...
    • Page 468

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    • HISTORY OF CEDAR CITY BY John Urie, 1880 Cedar City i s a beautiful little village situated on the r i m of the Great American Basin and is 5,615 feet above the level of the sea. With i t s 740 inhabitants (Census of 18801, i t s 135 houses, i t s...
    • Page 176

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    • We entered Parowan about 5 o'clock, May 17, and I was affectionately greeted by those persons who administered to my sufferings some weeks before. I had changed so much and grown so fat that not one of them knew me. Mrs. Heap, my old landlady,...
    • Page 471

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    • 55 stoves 9 swords 1001 lbs. of powder a n d lead 44 saddles 436 lights of glass (8 x 1 0 ) 1 9 0 lbs. of nails 137 chopping axes 45 mowing scythes 45 sickles 7 2 scythes and grain cradles 98 hoes 110 spades and shovels Carpenter tools--9t s e t s...
    • Page 210

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    • Nov. 9, 1916.. .Indian Agent. M r . F r a n k , met with Council and advised making arrangements for a school for the Indians, also a court to give them a legal s t a t u s and a t r a c t of land with water, the title to be vested in the...
    • Page 436

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    • same age as he was and sometimes people thought they were twins. Heaton was very dark-complexioned and Frank was quite light for a Mexican. At first, Frank worked for fifty cents a day, but eventually worked for room and board and went to school to...

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