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  • All fields: helping
(353 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 226

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    • "hly Brother Lehi, born Xovember 1854 at Cedar City Utah, was five feet nine inches in height and weighed 155 pounds. H e was very light in romplesiou, followed farming, stock raising and general business. By strict economy, thrift and industry, he...
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    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
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    • 10 fueled considerable anxiety around school board members and administrators, many of who had farm or small town backgrounds. Enthusiastic supporters were drawn to the promise of school gardens not only as a way to better implement nature study...
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    • 10 learning disabilities or those who just struggle in general. Many of these students also have difficulty understanding vocabulary as it relates to their world. Effective Instruction Finding the best programs and the most effective means of...
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    • 10 physically being at the bank. What criminals need are just laptops that connect to the bank networks. Then, they commit the crime remotely. As a result, no trace of fingerprint, hair, DNA, tire tracks etc can be found. However, the only trace...
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    • 11 instruction makes use of meaningful repetition, effective instruction increases the depth of students’ vocabulary knowledge, effective instruction fosters independence” (p. 77-79). Reading Programs and Interventions Involving ELLs While...
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    • 11 Limited early exposure is a factor that can easily be remedied by all teachers. Children need to experience expository texts through seeing, hearing, reading, and writing, prior to when they are expected to comprehend the material within the...
    • Page 117

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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
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    • 12 cognition is diminished, 1) decreased capacity in working memory, and 2) students lack of value for the subject. Students who fall into the mathematics anxiety, low SES, and lack of parental support groups described above have issues involving...
    • Page 127

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    • 120 Name'--- _ Class Period _ TAU.YSHEET FOR LEARNING S1YLEASSESSMENT Li.r b..-lll... ~·"ur IlL,n,bcT re'l'O'1lOC rur~·a..·la 9,...llt'iorl nil til" appl'''''Pri3l'l:'' line, (1:01' ......;1I\1J'L.- if~"lIT rc"!:,,,.1lOC t" #I ".~ .1, puc...
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    • 13 successfully have a significantly higher community participation rate at cultural, intellectual, athletic, and artistic events (Steinkamp, 1998, 34-59). Additionally, town-gown studies suggest that community members who have benefited from a...
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    • 14 These findings suggest that students need more stimulation in order to develop higher levels of thinking and cognition. Teaching mathematics through problem solving refers to the process of having students solve problems using any method that...
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    • 14 thirteen schools in the district (Givens-Ogle, Christ, & Idol, 1991). The system emphasized direct, data-based instruction and applied behavior analysis for at-risk students. The goal was to reduce special education referrals through more...
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    • 15 students that had previously given up to learn what was necessary to graduate and move on with their lives. The teachers were a key factor to allowing the curriculum to work for the student and discover alternatives for making learning work. One...
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    • 15 With regard to reading, basic oral English language vocabulary is not enough to help ELLs succeed academically. They may read and speak fluently but if they do not have the breadth and depth of the vocabulary, they struggle. They need to see...
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    • 16 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design Introduction Many web designers, including both the novice and experienced, create web con-tent that ignores principles of good design. Their pages may contain busy colored backgrounds, a multitude of animated...
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    • 16 The survey provided qualitative measures necessary to assess students’ attitudes towards the SMART interactive whiteboard versus the traditional whiteboard. The surveys include five questions scaling different degrees of responses about the...
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    • 17 Motivating Reluctant Readers Finding the “magic potion” to motivate engagement in a young reader is important. “Learning requires active student engagement in classroom activities and interaction—engaged students are motivated for literacy...
    • Page 189

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    • 179 TM12 What factors motivate and influence your decision to travel to a destination on vacation/for pleasure? Traveling to far away destinations TM13 What factors motivate and influence your decision to travel to a destination on vacation/for...
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    • 18 special educators are asked to take on the roles of intervention specialists, RtI experts, and Tier evaluators in addition to their undersold roles as high-quality instructors who perform daily with professional practices of rigor, excellence,...

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