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  • All fields: guided
(57 results)



Display: 20

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    • Testimonial videos 20 (1981) also emphasized the importance of strong arguments, “when the arguments presented in a message are inconclusive, the recipients’ thoughts are guided more by their preexisting attitudes than by the content of the...
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    • 52 voiced and suggestions could be made to tailor the classroom instruction to the needs of individual students. Collaboration encouraged services between general and special education to be integrated. The open professional communication improved...
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    • 55 determine if a child struggles reading fluently, but cannot define “specific skill deficits that are contributing to poor reading fluency or how to guide intervention” (Ysseldyke et al., 2010, p. 56- 57). Therefore, it is paramount for teachers...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 34 • Did the students participate? • Did you learn something from this lesson? The professional educators were directed to respond in an extremely specific manner, and were asked to answer “Why?” or “Why not?”...
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    • 43 FOR ALL ACTIVITIES Give activity full attention. Videogames, reservations, and other needs are secondary. Stay at the table rather than being behind the desk so that you are available for any questions or additional instruction necessary. For...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 25 Teacher Knowledge and Implementation, Fechtelkotter (2010) Response-To-Intervention in Schools: A Survey of Current Practices and Teacher Perceptions in Two States, and guided questions provided in...
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    • 66 Appendix A Interview Questions First Interview Questions 1. Describe the Response to Intervention model adopted by your school and the steps involved in implementation. 2. Describe your role in bringing this model to your school. 3. To what...
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    • \ViII be the last high school class to graduate from B. A. C quite a cute Lunch of greenling kids . . . . sweet and untarnished . . . . managed to have annual class party . . . . interested in such things as stock judging, athletics, dramatics,...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 28 Chapter 4 Results The purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of general education teachers on the school-wide implementation of RTI. The study provided the researcher with usable data to...
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    • 7 Chapter 2 Literature Review Math can pose problems for students, teachers, and parents alike. This project examines peer-revised research to determine common characteristics of successful and not so successful math students, teachers, and home...
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    • 15 presented are phonemic awareness, phonics instruction, guided oral reading, comprehension strategies, fluency, vocabulary development, computer technology, and teacher training (National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, 2000). All...
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    • 16 Health & Human Development, 2000). In addition, ELLs who are literate in their first language must be explicitly taught the similarities and differences in the alphabets, letter sounds, and phonemes that are found in their native language and...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 3 FranklinCovey Company. By not being funded by FranklinCovey and by targeting student perceptions, this study contributed to the field of character education and to the current literature about TLIM...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 40 Chapter 5 Discussion Mandates, like NCLB (2002) and IDEIA (2004), include high expectations for student proficiency, quality instruction, and research-based strategies which address achievement...
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    • 55 This may explain why School 11, from a district-wide perspective, was an outlier on in every category. Every time the indicators suggested they should have success, their scores came in low. Their high submission rate didn’t seem to make a...
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    • 56 For district or school administrators this study should be regarded as a caution that the program is not a silver bullet. Adoption of an AES program will not cure whatever low writing scores a school may have. In fact, for the program to be...
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    • 52 Kear, D., Coffman, G. A., McKenna, M. C., & Ambrosio, A. L. (2000). Measuring attitude toward writing: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, September 54(1). Keigher, A. (2009). Characteristics of public, private, and bureau of Indian...
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    • 39 Hill, N. E., & Taylor, L. C. (2004). Parental School Involvement and Children's Academic Achievement. Current Directions in Psychological Science (Wiley Blackwell), 13(4), 161-164. doi:10.1111/j.0963-7214.2004.00298.x Ho, H., Senturk D., Lam...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 46 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions held by fifth grade students, fifth grade teachers, and a principal about character education—specifically, TLIM program—and its...

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