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  • All fields: groups
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Display: 20

    • Page 23

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    • 17 reading” (p. 283). They continue to explain “the assessments should be sufficiently sensitive to small changes in the student’s reading performance” (Mesmer & Mesmer, 2008, p. 283). Besides indicating student growth, progress monitoring...
    • Page 143

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    • THE POTENTIALLY BRIGHT FUTURE OF RADIO 139 Jay Tunnell November 6, 2013 Sales Representative Radio Central Lake Havasu City, AZ 6. How have you changed over the years? Your view of radio? Why are you still in it? Still very effective medium has...
    • Page 41

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    • 38 All students were given the same DRP test, which was standard for all groups. As can be seen in Table 4.6 (pg 37), 10 of 12 students (83%) scored above a 9th grade level for reading comprehension, with half of the students scoring just above the...
    • Page 24

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 20 (2000) have suggested that the longer the activities, the more effective they are. The learning opportunities tend to be more focused, allow more opportunity for active learning, and are more coherent...
    • Page 59

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    • 52 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Tally Points Students' Self-Assessed Musical/Rhythmic Learning Style Scores Males Females Class Figure 4.7. Comparing 3rd and 4th Quarter, Students’ Self-Assessed Musical/Rhythmic Learning Style...
    • Page 25

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    • 21 Fantuzzo et al., 2005; Mead, 2008). Caucasian and Asian children demonstrated higher levels of skill in reading (Al Otaiba, Kosanovich-Grek, Torgesen, Hassler, & Wahl). Research by Fantuzzo et al. concluded “African American, Hispanic, and...
    • Page 25

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 21 student learning outcomes. This is accomplished through on-going collaboration and professional learning focused on understanding how students learn. New practices are learned, created, and implemented...
    • Page 145

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    • THE POTENTIALLY BRIGHT FUTURE OF RADIO 141 juggling act we are up against. 30. Does radio still have a 'hold' on local content and news, or is this information becoming more available, and sought after, online? Absolutely not. It's not done as well...
    • Page 43

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    • 40 of texts was chosen to enhance the accuracy of determining the students’ reading comprehension levels. A select few were also asked to read a narrative passage to measure reading fluency and words-correct-per-minute to give the researcher a...
    • Page 26

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    • 22 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this study was to examine the academic gains of students entering kindergarten at below-grade level, on-grade level, and above-grade level, to determine the amount of progress made throughout the year....
    • Page 8

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    • EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION 9 communication. At the time, they found CMC to be a more depersonalized form of communication (Garton & Wellman, 1993). Thus, in certain circumstances where less social information is required, and task-orientation is...
    • Page 28

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    • U.S. Embassy 28 As a result of this internship, my technical skills have grown as I have worked in groups, have learned new means of research and how to be a more effective researcher, have learned about management in a government organization,...
    • Page 41

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    • 38 Chapter 6 Implications The following specific recommendations were identified from the current study. The term educator in this chapter is used very loosely to include faculty, student life personnel and service center staff. Educators should...
    • Page 9

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    • EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION 10 boards and computer games (Reid, 1991). Walther (1995) found that when outsiders assessed the relational communication between CMC and FtF groups, they rated CMC higher in categories of both intimacy and social...
    • Page 19

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    • 16 discussions,” para. 2). In addition to student satisfaction, instructors noted the pleasure of hearing the ideas—many of which are “surprisingly compelling”—of the more introverted class members (2003). This format can also decrease...
    • Page 45

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    • 42 selection on the high school level, 18% of the participants were independent, 32% were instructional, and 45% were frustrated. Even though the same percentage scored on the instructional level for both types of selections, the results varied in...
    • Page 28

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    • 24 Procedures The tasks completed in order to meet the goals of this study were to administer the AIMSweb language arts curriculum-based measurements and the kindergarten teacher questionnaire using the following procedures to ensure reliability...
    • Page 23

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    • iGRIEVE 19 figures. Regardless of the size and nature of the group, the group constructs and maintains an identity that unites its members. There is always a context of meaning in the construction of collective memory, which is shared and passed...
    • Page 20

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    • 17 received or questions heard. Online, though, purposeful effort from the instructor is needed to reply to an email or communicate acknowledgement to students (Graham, 2004). Student recognition. Graham (2004) also found that online discussion...
    • Page 46

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    • 43 of the entire text being read was 7.17 out of 10. Students rated the validity, effectiveness, and accuracy of the test at 7.42, with the same number reflecting their agreement of the test results. They comprehended the texts at a high level...

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