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  • All fields: graduation
(52 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 14

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    • 11 would put forth effort and eventually pursue a postsecondary education in that particular field. Gemici and Rojewski (2010) used the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 to determine if having students take part in a work-based program while...
    • Page 29

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    • 26 Chapter 5 Discussion High school graduation should not be the end of the line for students; and educators should be assisting in curbing that effect. The at-risk students at SEA are so focused on making up missing credits that thoughts for the...
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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Alternative high schools across the country have searched for methods to improve graduation and literacy rates for their students. Noted for alarmingly high drop-out rates and poor student retention, alternative high schools...
    • Page 6

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    • 2 prepare for their future. Christenson and Thurlow (2004) found that the cost of dropouts is "estimated in the billions of dollars in lost revenues, welfare programs, unemployment programs, underemployment, and crime prevention and prosecution"...
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    • 3 In order to best serve the needs of students, AHS had several programs that help students meet their graduation goals. There were book clubs, mini-classes in a variety of subject areas, and collaborative groups. One program was a collaborative...
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    • 5 Chapter 2 Literature Review Alternative High Schools For years, high schools had a one size fits all mentality. Students were expected to learn the same way, study the same way, and learn the same things. If traditional school did not work for...
    • Page 13

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    • 9 adversity in their lives are those that are at-risk for dropping-out or giving up on society in general. Identifying who is at-risk was a critical part of implementing any student interventions. Interventions Used With At-Risk Students In the...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 interviewer would then ask for clarifying details. The interviews provided valuable information about who dropped out and what would help those that were on the fence about whether or not to quit school. Christensen and Thurlow (2004) reported...
    • Page 18

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    • 14 thirteen schools in the district (Givens-Ogle, Christ, & Idol, 1991). The system emphasized direct, data-based instruction and applied behavior analysis for at-risk students. The goal was to reduce special education referrals through more...
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    • 16 A School for Healing (1999) claimed that it is one of the most powerful interventions that could be used with at-risk students. Summary The collaborative group setting in all of these intervention examples helped increase graduation rates and...
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    • 17 Chapter Three Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study was to show the effects of a collaborative learning environment, compared to students working at their own pace, on student success toward meeting graduation requirements set by the...
    • Page 22

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    • 18 The student population of East Shore High School was primarily considered at-risk. 75% of the student population was Caucasian, 21% was Hispanic, and 5% were American Indian, Asian, Black, or Polynesian. Thirty four percent of the student...
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    • 21 Chapter 4 Results Introduction Discovering whether or not a collaborative study program would be beneficial in helping students earn credit toward high school graduation was the primary goal of this study. The students met for a total of ten...
    • Page 334

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    • GRONWAY R . PARRY Biography 1889 - 1969 Gronway Robert P a r r y was born February 2 2 . 1889, in Salt Lake City, Utah. His f a t h e r , Gronway, was a Salt Lake builder; his mother. Althea Gardner P a r r y , was the daughter of Pine Valley...
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    • 28 Chapter 5 Discussion Introduction Graduation has been a long-standing problem for alternative education students. The drop-out rate for alternative students, especially those at Alternative High School, was uncommonly high, 86%. The traditional...
    • Page 33

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    • 29 Another possible explanation for the success of the collaborative group might be the maturity level of students. Regardless of the type of student involved in the collaborative group, the students who were the most motivated and mature completed...
    • Page 34

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    • 30 success than independent learning. AHS would better serve their student population by organizing more cooperative learning groups with school-wide structure. The four hour a day structure was beneficial for a large number of alternative...
    • Page 35

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    • 31 based on the data from this program, but it did play a part. The administration brought many of the monthly results, combined with the results of the other collaborative group at the school, to the district office for their monthly reports. This...

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