Skip to main content

SUU Digital Library

Add or remove other collections to your search:



Narrow your search by:



You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: feminine
(26 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 14

    •  
    • differences in advertisements (Diehl, Terlutter, & Weinberg, 2003; Han & Shavitt, 1994; Lee & Lim, 2008; Sotnikova, 2010). Each researcher has applied these aspects to advertising and the effect they have on the audience’s perception of an...
    • Page 15

    •  
    • always have similar responses to the ads. In fact, most same-culture participants had opposite opinions. From this data he determined that gender perceptions depend more on consumer personality than their culture. His results concluded that...
    • Page 5

    •  
    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 1 Chapter One: Introduction The 1960’s were a time of growing dissatisfaction for women. The women of the 60’s had been raised by mothers who had been an essential part of the workforce during World War II. Following the example of...
    • Page 16

    •  
    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 12 "Mommy Party" it conveys weakness, meekness, and whatever other ignominious "-ness" the speaker has in mind. A decade ago, "Mommy Track" expressed contempt for the woman who, opting to interrupt her career to raise children,...
    • Page 20

    •  
    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 16 their day at work only to go home and begin a “second shift” of full-time housework (Hoschild, 1989). Because of these differing realities, men and women can approach the same situation, like a required after-hour work meeting,...
    • Page 70

    •  
    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 66 References Ardener, E. (1975). The “problem” revisited. In S. Ardener (Ed.), Perceiving women (pp. 19-27). London: Malaby Press. Ardener, S. (1978). Defining females. New York: Wiley. Becca. (2011, May 2). Barefoot and pregnant...
    • Page 74

    •  
    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 70 Fisher, W. R. (1987). Human communication as narration: Toward a philosophy of reason, value, and action. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press. Flanagan, C. (2006). To hell with all that: Loving and loathing our inner...
    • Page 16

    •  
    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 17 Badb, Macha, and Queen Maeve were also prominent feminist figures in the stories of the Celtic people. For a king to have success as a ruler, he must “marry” one of the goddesses in a divine ritual. In this...
    • Page 7

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 7 to blame by providing power to men and reinforcing that power through attitudes that elevate heterosexual males above women and gay individuals. Because of the domestic violence that seems to be acceptable practice by...
    • Page 9

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 9 dominance, if they exist on campus, and to determine if there is a need for diversity training which could help to diminish those negative social attitudes. Literature Review Lusher & Robins (2010) argued that “hegemony is...
    • Page 15

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 15 with scorecards stating ‘ladies’ tees, such men are semantically discouraged. In many ways, symbolically designating the forward tees as women’s ‘territory’ demasculinizes this space and discourages men from playing at that...
    • Page 16

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 16 their roles as sportscasters. Without female sportscasters, women’s professional sports will probably not be covered by the media as much as men’s professional sports. The media can change the perceptions of female athletes...
    • Page 17

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 17 males” (p. 128). Women have to basically become as similar to men as they can in order to be taken seriously and to break into the male dominated sport club. Meân and Kassing (2008) wrote: that in claiming membership of a...
    • Page 22

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 22 the nurturer. This depiction does not fit in with women in male-dominated sports. “This leaves an inconsistency when describing the female athlete, who might be heroic according to the male definitions of a hero but who is...
    • Page 31

    •  
    • HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY 31 This question was addressed through ten survey statements to determine any possible levels of homophobic attitudes on campus. Statement 6 was thrown out after the reliability test was completed because it was shown not to...
    • Page 43

    •  
    • Table 5 – Gender Bias Frequency Distribution of Means Statement f M SD Football is strictly a man’s game 392 2.29 1.3 Women can be just as strong as men 392 3.73 1.2 Men are the only real athletes 394 1.34 .69 Women and men are equals when it 393...
    • Page 50

    •  
    • perspectives & strengths to sports teams. (31) 32. Women can play sports and still be feminine. (32)      33. Women should only be allowed to play non-contact sports. (33)      34. Letting female athletes into sports can ruin the...
    • Page 57

    •  
    • Appendix C – Survey Results when playing sports. 30 30. Female athletes can be just as aggressive as male athletes. 7 8 21 127 241 404 4.45 31 31. Female athletes can bring positive perspectives & strengths to sports teams. 2 7 17 140 238 404...

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK