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  • All fields: families
(391 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 226

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    • "hly Brother Lehi, born Xovember 1854 at Cedar City Utah, was five feet nine inches in height and weighed 155 pounds. H e was very light in romplesiou, followed farming, stock raising and general business. By strict economy, thrift and industry, he...
    • Page 357

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    • 1 church suit case that the Edmunds-Tucker Law was unconstitutional, you would, with God's blessing, soon see me in old Cedar, but they dare not do it. We must 'do what is nght and let the consequence follow.' 1enclose the last letter 1received...
    • Page 15

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    • 10 for poor school outcomes, not only because of language issues, but also because of socioeconomic issues (Goldenberg, 2008). Most Hispanic Americans are characterized as having low levels of educational success and high rates of poverty, and this...
    • Page 16

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    • 11 1995). These deficits may contribute to the fact that Hispanic students, with relatively few exceptions, have had the highest high-school dropout rate of any group in the United States from 1972-2007. High School student dropouts from the low...
    • Page 16

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    • 11 demonstrate positive attitudes toward learning mathematics are found to have more positive attitudes and higher self-efficacy when it comes to mathematics (Wilkins, 2000; Sewell and Hauser 1980). Wilkins (2000) points out that parents who have...
    • Page 17

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    • 12 families who would like to send their children to preschool, the cost for private preschools is often prohibitive, and there is not sufficient state or federal funding for government preschools. Given the current educational status of Hispanic...
    • Page 19

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    • 13 community to display children’s work, bringing children’s artifacts from home to display at school, and sharing photographs outside the classroom (Feiler et al., 2008). In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Education’s (USDOE)...
    • Page 18

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    • 13 oral language, and potentially positive effects for early reading, writing, and knowledge of print (Institute of Education Sciences, 2006). Ideally, intervention would come for low SES Hispanic ELLs when they are very young, but this is...
    • Page 20

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    • 14 the school by using funds from the Effective Teaching and Learning Literacy Program (USDOE, 2010a). These government programs are examples of how educators and scholars are redefining literacy as the term expands into the experiences and lives...
    • Page 21

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    • 15 students. Unfortunately, there is a connection between the number of students who qualify for Title I services and “children who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet state academic standards” (USDOE, 2010b). Schools that have at...
    • Page 22

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    • 16 reading achievement among children across most of the countries, and that higher economic levels of a country were related to richer home-literacy environments, whereas lower economic levels were associated with poorer home-literacy...
    • Page 21

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    • 17 achievement is differentiated instruction. This takes place when the curriculum’s pacing, level, and depth are modified to meet the unique demands of students (McCoach, O’Connell, & Levitt, 2006). According to Hall, Strangman, & Meyer...
    • Page 20

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    • 17 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this thesis is to examine the relevance of reflection as a comprehensive link between service and cognitive learning in higher education. Participants Participants of this study were 20 Utah Valley University...
    • Page 23

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    • 17 of how Purcell-Gates (1995) provided reading intervention for Donny in exchange for documentation and careful examination of literacy development through the social and cultural perspectives of a family from the “white underclass, a minority...
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    • 17 The benefits of learning in school gardens can be plentiful. The school, community, teachers, families, and students, all benefited from school gardens. Interdisciplinary learning. School gardens have been a tool to teach multiple subjects at...
    • Page 24

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    • 18 discovery that emerged from this qualitative study were the differences in the amounts of literacy activities that took place per hour. For example, even though these families were all from low- SES backgrounds, researchers categorized them into...
    • Page 22

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    • 18 programs need to be very high quality and aligned with high-quality kindergarten programs (Mead, 2008). Another factor that has been identified as important to pre-kindergarten programs is the teacher belief system (Lar-Cinisomo, Fuligni,...
    • Page 23

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    • 19 5. Collegiality and professionalism. (Korkmaz, 2007, p. 390). Furthermore, an effective school must be open to the ideas and feelings of teachers and students. Schools need to have in place an effective way of communicating with all employees,...

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