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    • yearbook1917i039: Sophomores -- 19's

    • Beaver Murdock Academy--Beaver (Beaver County, Utah); School yearbooks
    • Sophomores -- 19's. During the first month of the school year (1916-17) the Sophomores organized themselves as the Second Year Class of the Murdock Academy. Grant Smith was elected President, Nettie Messenger, Vice President, and Golda Baldwin,...
    • Page 142

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    • Nov. 7, 1903.. .From the Iron County Record: "Battle of the Ballots" The Citizen's Prohibition Party wins the fight, three to one for prohibition. Republicans nailed their colors to the A strongly mast and fought with energy of despair. contested...
    • Page 224

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    • ARCHIBALD SWAPP Biography 1877 - 1955 Archibald Swapp was born December 21, 1877, in New Mexico. He was the oldest son in his father's family. He married Ada May Little, and they resided in Glendale. Utah until about 1914. Eight of their ten...
    • Page 437

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    • WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Built 1915 at a cost of $60,450 55 North 300 West On Feb. 1 , 1977, a Bond Election was held to build a new City Building. The results were a s follows: For--946 votes, and against--1267 votes. July 21, 1977. . . (City...
    • Page 472

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    • scene could hardly be conceived. The toil-worn and hardy pioneers, with uncovered heads bent in reverence to the Almighty, thanked Him for H i s kindly care in bringing them to a land where conscience was free, with liberty undiluted. and asked H i...
    • Page 481

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    • was hoisted on the evening of the third of July, 1852. It was also during the year of 1852 that the mining industry in Iron County began. W might mention that, e about this time, the first gold discovered in the County was found at Parowan, in the...
    • Page 490

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    • apostles saw i t , was not so much the smelting of iron, vital though this was to the pioneer economy, b u t , more importantly, the building of a harmonious and unified community here on the borders of civilization. This was to be done in spite of...
    • Page 11

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    • dirt . . . which every man is said to eat in his lifetime. It filled our eyes too, and our ears, and our nostrils. It was in the food; it sprinkled the pancakes; it was in the syrup that we poured over them. Half suffocated were we by it, during...
    • Page 14

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    • City, so the population grew very quickly. The residents looked forward in anticipation to each new company because, not only were they glad to see relatives and friends who had followed, but they always brought mail with them from Kanesville which...
    • Chapter II - Iron Mission - Page 19

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    • CHAPTER 1 1 IRON MISSION 1851 T ne lvmrmon settlers were a peculiarly close-hit, harrnonious group, working cooperatively together. In order to make for " efficiency, each one was expected to do, voluntady and with untpestioning obedience, the...
    • Page 88

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    • Thunder on the mountains and the creek still rising. I looked around today to see what all the brethren in camp were doing. I found them all very busy, some ploughmg, some planting seeds, some building houses, and but three putting up fence. I just...
    • Page 112

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    • ofthe mountains were blessed with an array of trained laborers. This was a vital factor in the success of the Mormons as color~izers.~ Experienced workers had been sent to southern Utah to help in the manufacture of iron, but they were encountering...
    • Page 213

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    • Taking advantage of the predawn blackness the moming of September 8, the Indians slipped down a s m d ravine and mortally wounded more than ten emigrants before they could reach the safety of their wagons. The emigrants humedly heaped a wall of...
    • Page 218

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    • joumeyed to Salt Lake Valiey ready to die with the Saints rather than submit to further persecution, is one of the h e s t exarnples of the unity and faith of the Mormon people. The attitude was maintained throughout by the Mormon leaders that,...
    • Page 242

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    • across the continent by solitas. horsernen carrying fifteen pounds of letters. The charge to send this mail was $5 per one-half ounce. Stations were located about twenty-four miles apart. As his day's nde, each nder was requued to span three...
    • Page 252

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    • article appeared in the Deseret News on Wednesday, April 16, 1863: Parowan Cotton Factory--The cotton mill at Parowan, owned by Ebenezer Hanks, is so far completed as to be doing tolerable good work, with a fair prospect that it will be a success,...
    • Page 300

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    • Macfarlane, Jacob Gates, Truman O. Angell, Aiex F. Macdonald, David H. Cannon, Charles Smith, Joseph Birch, John O. Angus, Richard Bentley, Jesse N. Smith, Monis Ensign, Chnstopher J. Arthur, James G. Bleak, Archibald Sullivan, John Lytle, Ira...

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