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    • Page 11

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    • 8 the use of modern technology]” (Windsor, 2011 pg. 1). Despite extensive research in core curriculum development and educational technology innovation many parents are choosing to send their students to schools where technology is not present...
    • Page 24

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    • 21 Pro: All student participation. The researcher gave each student manipulatives and conducted several mini-lessons, modeling the lesson concept using manipulatives. The students then created the teacher sample to display on their desks and then...
    • Page 25

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    • 22 needed to refer back to this information were unable to do so. Absent students had to learn the concept on their own, or find a time when the teacher and student could meet together to allow the educator to teach the student the concept missed....
    • Page 27

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    • 24 different pages quickly and efficiently kept the students engaged and made the lessons move at a quicker speed. The researcher found that the fast paced lesson and electronic based manipulatives, through the interactive whiteboard software, kept...
    • Page 30

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    • 27 Table 1Mathematics Background Knowledge Pre and Post Mean Scores and Gain Scores Groups Pre-assessment Mean Post-assessment Mean Gain Treatment group 1 Interactive Whiteboard 2.4 12 +9.6 Treatment group 2 Traditional Whiteboard 2.6 11.4 +8.8 The...
    • Page 36

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    • 33 and to enhance students’ abilities and education experience. With new technology being made available to educators and learners a like, the researcher wondered if interactive whiteboards in elementary schools are useful and beneficial or if it...
    • Page 48

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    • worked so hard riding the Pony Express so that he could save a little money for himself above the needs of the family to afford some good clothes and real shoes. Up until this time he had worn only the clothes sewn by his mother and nioccasins on...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 4 Chapter 1 – Introduction Students are naturally curious, and often wonder about the basis of their education. They ask, “Why do I need to know what a square root is?” or “Who cares about the wars in our...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 17 Badb, Macha, and Queen Maeve were also prominent feminist figures in the stories of the Celtic people. For a king to have success as a ruler, he must “marry” one of the goddesses in a divine ritual. In this...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 26 One such myth comes from Polynesian culture, and is the reason for the name of one of the islands. He was a trickster hero who often helped mankind, but who was also mischievous toward the gods. He is...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 27 feel comfortable and in control. Innumerable projects and lesson plans emerge as a result of allowing students to take advantage of this prevalent genre. Divaricating Opinions on the Most Effective Teaching...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 28 contained in a droplet or the whole mystery of life within the egg of a flea. For the symbols of mythology are not manufactured; they cannot be ordered, invented, or permanently suppressed. They are...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 29 Chapter 3 – Methodology The purpose of this creative research project was to design, develop, and evaluate a sixteen lesson unit on Greek mythology (with a technology focus) for use with tenth grade...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 31 • Creation of Lesson 13 (appx. 3 days) • Creation of Lesson 14 (appx. 3 days) • Creation of Lesson 15 (appx. 3 days) • Creation of Lesson 16 (appx. 3 days) • Creation of Student Survey (appx. 3 days) •...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 33 • A survey for the educators to complete • A Survey for students to complete Evaluation The completed project was evaluated by using the surveys that were given to the panel of professional English...
    • Page 51

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 44 (Berkowitz & Bier, 2005, p. 276). Olsson (2009) most clearly stated the effects of adult modeling in education: “We teach who we are” (p. 43). Berkowitz (2002) expanded on this notion: It is clear that the...
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    • vii Acknowledgments I would like to take this opportunity to graciously thank Prent Klag for his wisdom, help, and red pencil. I would also like to thank the teachers, parents, and administration at both SUCCESS Academy and Gateway Preparatory...
    • Page 31

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    • 25 to create their own custom tests. These tests can be used to get a more in-depth understanding of each individual’s weaknesses on specific objectives. YPP reports provide details about the skills and concepts tested and include the corresponding...
    • Page 41

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    • 35 Table 4 shows the items as well as the Gateway Preparatory Academy teacher responses for the Likert items of the survey. Table 4 Gateway Preparatory Academy Teacher Survey Results Question Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree nor...
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    • Acknowledgements I am grateful for the opportunity I had to work on this Masters Thesis. I am especially appreciative to Dr. Katy Herbold for her knowledge and expertise in helping me put together this Masters project and leading me to completion....

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