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    • 1 ENGAGING SECONDARY STUDENTS IN MATHEMATICS WITH PROJECTS CREATED BY IMPLEMENTING HOWARD GARDNER’S MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES Chapter 1 Introduction In the last couple of decades emphasis has been placed on Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences....
    • Page 107

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    • 100 the statement, “Math is hard for me even when I study” and after the real-life math activities involving the bodily/kinesthetic learning style disagreed strongly. Females were neutral but changed slightly after the activities (see Figure...
    • Page 108

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    • 101 complained when anything they were required to accomplish took more time than they thought it should. Students’ understanding of math was very interesting. Pupils leaned towards disagreeing with the statement, “Math brings out my...
    • Page 109

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    • 102 High School are females? The boys also disagreed with the statement but not as strongly (see Figure 4.31). Depending on the different types of activity the students were working on determined the different learning styles they used. After the...
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    • 103 Eighteen out of the twenty-two students used six of the learning styles. Musical/rhythmic learning style was not used in the presentation (see Figure 4.35). The final project given to the student was a scale drawing. Six students did not...
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    • 104 Students showed excitement in learning math concepts. Not all students stated that they enjoyed math but using real-life math activities was beneficial for the educator and the students.
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    • 106 Learning in detail about the different learning styles created by Howard Gardner increased my desire to implement the strategies that have been proven to help students learn to the best of their abilities. Even though at times I feel frustrated...
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    • 107 I learned during the research how very important it is to use cross curriculum to encourage interest in mathematics. I have learned that reaching one child is worth all the time, effort and persistence it takes. Being an advocate does make a...
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    • 11 engaging if they include names of students in the class. Students often benefit from creating problems for each other (Wadlington and Wadlington, 2008). Writing stories and listening to books are not the only ways an individual...
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    • 11 student attitudes regarding the homework, and lack of time to prepare effective assignments. Students simply do not like homework. The time homework requires, cuts into their extracurricular activities and downtime away from school. A lack of...
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    • 117 Appendix C Learning style and math interest surveys Learning style surveys were given on Wednesday, March 10, 2010. This survey was to inform the educator of the different learning styles preferred by her students. She would take...
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    • 13 Mattos, & Weber, 2009, p. 28). Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, and Young (2003) prefer standard protocol because “everyone knows what to implement, and it is easier to train practitioners to conduct an intervention correctly and to assess the accuracy of...
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    • 14 allowed to draw the ideas presented (Nolen, 2003). He/she likes to work with maps, puzzles, charts, visualizations and images (Denig, 2004). Students all benefit from visuals. Today, individuals with learning disabilities are mainstreamed. Chris...
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    • 144 Appendix E Collection of Real-life math assignments/activities Seven stories were chosen for the first activity from Math Stories for Problem Solving Success (Overholt, et. al., 1990). They were Tessa’s grounding, Jake’s surprise, The Pro...
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    • 16 area”(Silvermann, 2002). In fact, rote recall of sequential math steps in order to answer math problems leads to a shallow level of understanding (Rapp, 2009). The visual spatial learner has the same probability of being successful...
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    • 2 behind academically they lose a certain amount of self-confidence. This is especially crucial when dealing with math. The time restraints in a regular education classroom make it difficult for a teacher to address the varying problems of each...
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    • 2 Chapter 1 Introduction- Nature of the Problem School gardens have constituted a valuable opportunity to integrate curriculum and provide hands-on learning. The school garden movement planted itself in numerous education philosophies including...
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    • 2 implemented as instructional projects to engage students in mathematics at Parowan High School. The instructional projects the students choose for their activity will be worked on and completed outside of the regular classroom. The educator will...
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    • 22 A common interpretation of the link between low parental knowledge and child/adolescent problem behavior is that parents, by actively monitoring the nature of their adolescents’ activities and companions, are better able to intervene, which in...
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    • 22 can be aided through imagination exercises. They could be given long-term projects with various stages that need to be checked before moving onto the next. This will help the student strengthen their abilities of patience and procedure. These...

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