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Display: 20

    • Page 9

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 9 K.M. Weiland in her book Outlining your Novel takes the writer step by step through the outlining process. In Chapter One, she answers the questions of should you outline, what are the benefits of outlining, then...
    • Page 12

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 12 Story Structure: Larry Brooks’ book Story Engineering covers in some detail all the elements of writing. He says that “neither a killer idea nor a Shakespearean flair for words will get you published without a...
    • Page 13

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 13 young wizard is sent to boarding school where he finds that someone is trying to steal a stone that can give life to the most evil wizard that ever lived. One of the big mistakes that a writer can make is to...
    • Page 14

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 14 seems to favor Peeta and she is pretty much left on her own. Then during the games everything she does goes wrong even when it goes right. When Katnis uses the Killerjaks to take out the group from the capitol...
    • Page 15

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 15 However, in this Capstone Project, grounded theory is being used for two things: 1. To find the information necessary to produce the script and create PowerPoint slides for teaching the different topics to...
    • Page 17

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 17 PowerPoint presentations help keep the presenter on track. They are easy to make and easy to read. However, PowerPoint presentations are used so often that they tend to be horribly boring with too much...
    • Page 18

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 18 Lesson Overview Lesson 1: This lesson teaches the three steps that show to make an outline that ensures that the message is clear and compelling. 1. The presenter needs to decide on the Goal of the presentation....
    • Page 19

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 19 3. It is essential to explain why the number on a slide are important. Take the time to explain charts and graphs. The presenter shouldn’t expect the audience to automatically understand as much about his...
    • Page 21

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 21 Lesson 6 Lesson six discusses using photos and Images. The presenter must be careful to use only pictures from Creative Commons licenses. There are a number of royalty-free images on the morguefile.com and...
    • Page 22

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 22 Using the Beat Sheet or how to outline your novel effectively isn’t integral to the actual story. In other words, the reader won’t know if the writer is an outliner or a pantser. A pantser is a writer who just...
    • Page 23

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 23 crashing down on the hero easier to write. If the writer knows what the mid-point scene is, he can build each scene from the beginning to the mid-point. If the writer know what death and despair scene is—this is...
    • Page 28

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 28 Slide 8—Core Competency #4—Story Structure There are 4 parts to Story Structure that fit into 4 boxes. Each box takes about 25% of the book. There are about 60 scenes per book divided by 4 Slide 9—Story...
    • Page 29

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 29 There are two rules for Box 4. Hero needs to be heroic—no one else can resolve the story or the author has failed the reader. Hero can perish, but must resolve the major elements of the story before he does Slide...
    • Page 53

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 53 Appendix Three Your Suspense Toolbox Macro Suspense Suspense is what is going to happen next to your lead character and does it mean death to the hero. Each scene must end with suspense to keep the reader turning...
    • Page 23

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 19 Since first-year college writing courses “are designed to encourage students to, in the words of one instructor, ‘just know that there are different ways to solve different writing situations’” (Fanetti, et al., 2010, p.82), high school...
    • Page 43

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 39 analysis, questionnaires, and surveys. Standardized exams from Prentice Hall’s Pearson 11th and 12th grade textbooks will be used both at the beginning and end of the semester to collect summative test results, which will be both unbiased and...
    • Page 49

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 45 collected in September using questions created by the researcher through an online testing service (socrative.com), included both open-ended questions and questions based on the Likert scale to determine students’ intent to further their...
    • Page 50

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 46 who they are today; this assignment was more commonly referred to as the “Define Me” essay. Students were provided with a six-category, four-point rubric (see Appendix C) and were assessed based on Introduction, Sentence Structure, Word Choice,...
    • Page 53

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 49 to write a response to the following open-ended question: “Regardless of the score you received, do you feel as though your writing has improved in your native language based on guidelines taught in English class?” Standardized Test The exact...
    • Page 65

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 61 structure)”; “A good introduction with a good hook will make your paper interesting”; “That I need to be more open to different types of topics and know more about writing”; “That you have to adapt depending on the type of paper you’re working...

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