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  • All fields: deficit
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    • 1930_all 10

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    • Student Body Officers VERT IS WOOD President WAYNE BRYANT Vice-President JUNE FOSTER Secretary WESLEY PRYOR Commissioner of Publications REX LLOYD Sophomore Representative MELBA MIDLETOX Freshman Representative E. RAY LYMAN Athletic Council ARTHUR...
    • 1927 59

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    • Publications HE organization behind the publications at the B. A. C. is largely responsible for their success. Just as debating, dramatics, or athletics, is under the supervision of a coach, so are "The Student" and "The Agricola." It is the duty...
    • Page 270

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    • EXPENDITURES Appointive Officers City Manager Attorney Justice of Peace Assistant Treasurer Appointive Officer Elective Officers City Councilmen City Recorder City Treasurer Office Supplies City Park Caretaker Supplies Monuments Fire Department...
    • Page 12

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    • 6 Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). A few primary goals of IDEA include “providing incentives for whole-school approaches, scientifically based early reading programs, positive behavioral interventions and supports, and early intervening...
    • Page 27

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    • 21 counterparts (NAEP, 2011). RTI gives educators the flexibility to meet the needs of diverse learners to help all students find success in learning to read. Another group of students who would benefit from the focused and individualized nature of...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS blueprint of what an effective intervention should look like based on these previous findings. Initial Treatments Over the past 25 years, a variety of treatment approaches have been used in an attempt to remediate the...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 13 Klinger, Palardy, Gilmore and Bodin, 2003, p. 687; Bellini, Peters, Benner, and Hopf, 2007; White, Keonig, Scahill, 2006). A second early strategy for addressing social skills deficits was simply to include students...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 17 “initiations”, and robust decreases in the subcategories of “unexpected verbal” and “unexpected nonverbal”. (p. 581) This program followed a peer-mediated format. The curriculum was developed and used in...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS to demonstrate the skill, but he or she does not demonstrate fluency at it yet. These deficits were remediated by providing multiple opportunities for practice of the targeted skill in non-threatening situations. When...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 19 outcomes, from “ineffective” to “highly effective”. Based on their research, Gresham et al. (2001) provided a number of recommendations in designing an effective social skills intervention, including...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS programs. Lane et. al. defined organizing intervention groups as the third step in the process. Groups could be organized by class designation, skill deficit targeted, demographics, or even randomly. Training...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 29 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this creative project was to improve social thinking skills for students with high functioning autism (HFA) in second and third grades in a small rural setting in southern Utah....
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS self-esteem should rise. Thus, as a result of this project, parents and teachers should observe improved self-esteem in participants. Participants and Setting Those who were chiefly impacted by the study were two...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 31 unstructured times such as recess, hallway transitions, and lunch settings. His second hurdle was most visible during structured class time. This was a communication deficit, where he inappropriately communicated...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 43 During one event, student A shared his reactions after an impulsive physical response to bodily contact with another student, "I told my hands, 'Hands are not for hitting.' but they didn't listen!” This...
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    • THE WEB 8 online learning is that clear, constant communication is essential. Distance learners can feel disconnected from their programs and instructors because of the physical distance between themselves and those with whom they are interacting....
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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 67 Pavitt, C. (1999). Theorizing about the group communication-leadership relationship. In L.R. Frey, D.S. Gouran & M.S. Poole (Eds.), The handbook of group communication theory and research. Thousand Oaks CA:...
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    • Emotional Manipulation and Psychopathy 4 The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) has attempted to include the concept of psychopathy in several forms including ASPD or antisocial personality disorder (APA, 1994). This has caused some confusion...
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    • Emotional Manipulation and Psychopathy 5 culpability for the behavior of the individuals. The blame has been entirely placed on the brain of the individual and it is asserted that it can be indeed fixed. Partially crossing the lines between deficit...
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    • Emotional Manipulation and Psychopathy 6 Lukas, Qunaibi, Schuerkens, Kunert, Freese, Flesch, Mueller-Isberner, Osterheider & Sass, 2001). Electrodermal responses are believed to be a marker for fear. They found that, in contrast to non-psychopaths,...

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