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  • All fields: crops
(103 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 450

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    • and children fiom the upper colonies were being evacuated to El Paso and the Diaz people were advised to flee immediately across the border. Before they left they could hear gunfire in the distance. Hans Larsen, a colonist, wrote: "We tumed our...
    • Page 56

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    • Exemplifying the rapid growth of the B.A.C. the Ag. Dept. has recently been enlarged to include several third year classes. It is now possible for agricultural students to obtain a B.S. degree with only one year in a senior college. Classes offered...
    • Page 493

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    • chronicler put i t , "the fact that the present site was not the proper one on which to permanently locate the iron works." A s if to reassure himself that even this cloud had a silver lining, he noted that "the freshet also brought down from the...
    • Page 212

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    • rode into the he& of the town, fired indiscriminately at citizens at close quarters and wounded several residents. After a series of incidents with the local authorities, buiidings, including the town's storehouse of grain, were broken open and...
    • 1905, May 29

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    • Mon. May 29, 1905: Ther. Warm., Wea. Rain 9 pm Mostly cloudy. We went to Comanche then east about ten miles to Brother A.M. Williams. The folks are well, have been chilling a little lately. Are trying to work in the crops but the land is most too...
    • Page 470

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    • drive the herd another twenty miles to Dublan to load them on the train. That night &er the cattle were loaded, the cow hands had a miserable night's rest after they gathered up al1 they had with them and climbed into a box car half loaded with...
    • Page 44

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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 45 identifying only one theme. The story, which was unanimously supported in both the photographs and the text, had three prevailing themes that served as the structure of the story. The textual portion of the story discussed how a...
    • 1914, Oct 26

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    • Mon. Oct. 26, 1914: Ther. Fine Wea. Clear Working around gathering what I can of the crops. Tuesday 27: Ther. Pleasant Wea. clear Went to the cable and got a load of potatoes. got back a long time after dark.
    • Page 473

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    • three-room flat that we rented--Mother Lunt [Sarah], Parley, Owen, Alma, Clarence, Frank, Heaton and 1 and little Virl, our year-old baby. Some of the boys got jobs of ditferent kinds. They would mow lawns or do anything they could for 50 cents a...
    • Page 489

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    • There had been no colonists living in Pacheco for six years, but the revolution was subsiding and a feeling of peace and safety was returning. The recovery of the colonies from the depression caused by ten years of revolution was slow and...
    • Page 46

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    • 42 U.S. TV SHOW’ INFLUENCE IN CHINA appealing to them. In particular, “The American Dream” represents positive emotions, spirit and specific character of U.S.. This category contains the following similar opening codes: “Dream,” “Poor to Rich,”,...
    • Page 69

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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 70 (example in figure 6) and one photograph (page 123) touches on how this process affects our environment. However, the textual portion discusses exactly how our honey bees affect not just the environment, but also people. On page 120,...
    • Page 74

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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 75 discusses how the pipeline will affect the area’s wildlife and sea creatures as well as the people who are natives to the area. For the textual portion, the ‘environmental’ theme is the most dominant, the ‘geographical’ theme is the...
    • Page 19

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    • vending of spirituous liquors in Cedar City: 2 . . .All ordinances p a s s e d , a n d licenses Sec. heretofore g r a n t e d , for distilling and selling spirituous liquors in Cedar City a r e hereby repealed. Dec. 18, 1858.. .An Ordinance...
    • Preface - Page ix

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    • In this biography of one of Utah's early pioneers, Henry Lunt, you will read about the almost unsurmountable difficulties experienced by some of the people who settled the Utah Territory. The hardships were numerous. The dangerous wagon trails...
    • Page 260

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    • beautiful and secluded vale. 1 could not but notice with great pleasure and satisfaction the labors of Brother Jessie Eldredge who is teaching school. The scholars are learning unusually fast and are much attached to their teacher. They have got...
    • Page 261

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    • the preceding day attended by President Erastus Snow [President of the Southem Mission], Elder Richard Robiion of Pinto Creek, James H. M a y of Harmony, John Hamilton of Hamilton's Fort, Patriarch Elisha H. Groves of Kanarra, Bishop Willis of T o...
    • Page 14

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    • THE WORD ANASAZI CHILDS - 14 she told me a story about her grandmother and the extensive raiding problems associated with the Navajo: The Navajo had been raiding the Paiutes often and so when this would happen, the women would take the small...
    • Page 13

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    • plains was so well organized that many of the prior problems had been solved and some diarists described the trip as a rather enjoyable event. Henry Lunt's company reached the Great Salt ~ a k valley on e August 28, 1850." After traveling through a...

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