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  • All fields: crops
(79 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 489

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    • There had been no colonists living in Pacheco for six years, but the revolution was subsiding and a feeling of peace and safety was returning. The recovery of the colonies from the depression caused by ten years of revolution was slow and...
    • Page 19

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    • vending of spirituous liquors in Cedar City: 2 . . .All ordinances p a s s e d , a n d licenses Sec. heretofore g r a n t e d , for distilling and selling spirituous liquors in Cedar City a r e hereby repealed. Dec. 18, 1858.. .An Ordinance...
    • Preface - Page ix

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    • In this biography of one of Utah's early pioneers, Henry Lunt, you will read about the almost unsurmountable difficulties experienced by some of the people who settled the Utah Territory. The hardships were numerous. The dangerous wagon trails...
    • Page 260

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    • beautiful and secluded vale. 1 could not but notice with great pleasure and satisfaction the labors of Brother Jessie Eldredge who is teaching school. The scholars are learning unusually fast and are much attached to their teacher. They have got...
    • Page 261

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    • the preceding day attended by President Erastus Snow [President of the Southem Mission], Elder Richard Robiion of Pinto Creek, James H. M a y of Harmony, John Hamilton of Hamilton's Fort, Patriarch Elisha H. Groves of Kanarra, Bishop Willis of T o...
    • Page 13

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    • plains was so well organized that many of the prior problems had been solved and some diarists described the trip as a rather enjoyable event. Henry Lunt's company reached the Great Salt ~ a k valley on e August 28, 1850." After traveling through a...
    • Page 21

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    • shalt raise up a posterity that shall hold the Priesthood and be saviors on Mount Zion, for thou art a faithful heir to the Priesthood and thou art of the blood of Joseph who was sold into Egypt. Thou hast a right to all blessings that were sealed...
    • Page 279

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    • schools. Our Cooperative store paid thirty-one per cent on a capital stock of $4000, one thousand of this being invested in a threshing machine. Our Sheep Cooperative herd brought, d things considered, about i $450, and we are indulging in the...
    • Page 288

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    • A son, Richard Henry Lunt, was born to Ann Gower Lunt and Henry Lunt on Nov. 17, 1872. He died the same day. Most commu~ties a cooperative sheep and cattle herd in had which each person, and the church, turned their sheep or cattle over to the...
    • Page 40

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    • for a state road from Peteetneet to Iron Springs, one for an exploration to find a new route from Tooele County to this place via Sevier Lake, and one for a railroad from the Great Salt Lake City to Iron spring^.^ To avoid the wind which blew out...
    • Page 4

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    • Testimonial videos 4 Introduction J. Stanford “Stan” Staheli grew up in a small, rural town of southwest Utah. He had a hay field behind his parents’ house. One day when he was a child, his father went into town. He and his brother decided they...
    • Page 9

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    • Testimonial videos 9 style marketing videos to be displayed on our website, in our digital owners’ manuals, and throughout social media. Last year’s interviews featured owners from a limited geographic area (Utah, Idaho and Nevada), and it seemed...
    • Page 47

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    • evening and found in his gizzard some tivo dollars worth of gold dust. It has produced no small excitement in town. February 25: I examined the gold taken out of Pugmire's rooster and believe it to be brass. I placed my magnet in it and it took it...
    • Page 49

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    • If love and reason could but guide With thee I'd brave the ocean wide, And live for thee alone. Go where you will, I'm still the same, My heart is fixed. I oft exclaim 'We may be happy yet.' And when the farewell tear is dry'd Heaven prosper thee,...
    • Page 50

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    • number of men composing the settlement and performing all this work did not exceed one hundred and twenty all told, including old men, boys, and Indian servants just being tamed and initiated into the iirst rudiment of industry. Within a few...
    • Page 30

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    • this opportunity to send you these few lines again, hoping it will reach you and find you all well as it leaves us at present through the mercy of God." " We received your most welcon~e and loving letter, my dear children, and we were most happy to...
    • Page 55

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    • were no human bones6 The water fiom Center Creek washed out the headgate at the mill race on Friday, May 30. In addition to the water problems, the cattle were destrovine the wheat because of inadeauate fences. President , Smith gave notice that,...
    • Page 31

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    • had to be cleared of sagebl-ush and greasewood. Heavy d r a p were made of tree trunks and poles, and the t~rushwas hurned. T h e plows were made of mountain mahogany and the shares of iron. Often, the land was hard and dry, and water for the...
    • Page 32

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    • in the valleys of thc Rio Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers for the purpose of raising cotton.' Later, people were called to settle these areas. Those called were mostly from central and northern Utah. As the months wore on, Thomas l)ecame increasingly...
    • Page 57

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    • to be . . . Yours forever faitally and affectionately, Martha Bristols Henry managed to focus his mind on the things at hand, since he was so busy working with the settlers to build a community. He toiled in the fields every day until the last rays...

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