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    • 1901, page 16

    • 1901, page 16
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    • 16 SOUTHERN BRANCH. Elementary Zoology: This is a thoroughly practical course for teachers, and little. attention is given to those subjects which the teacher cannot use in common school work. Burnett's Zoology is used. 3 hours per week,...
    • 1902, page 22

    • 1902, page 22
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    • 22 SOUTHERN BRANCH the student with the histology of the body. Some pathological conditions are investigated and sources of disease located. 2 hours per week throughout the year. Geology.-This work will be considered under three...
    • 1903, page 29

    • 1903, page 29
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    • 29 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. Catiline are read and translated with a more careful study of conditional sentences. Work in writing Latin and conversational exercises in Latin are given throughout the year. Three hours per week throughout the...
    • 1904, page 26

    • 1904, page 26
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    • 26 SOUTHERN BRANCH GERMAN. MR. MABEY. German 1. ELEMENTARY COURSE. The object of the first year's work is to familiarize the student with German construction so far as to enable him to read easy German text without difficulty....
    • 1905, page 30

    • 1905, page 30
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    • 30 SOUTHERN BRANCH. tion for a systematic acquisition of vocabulary. The grammar and composition work is equivalent to that comprised in part f of Thomas's Practical German Grammar.. A number of easy texts are read and short poems memorized....
    • 1906, page 31

    • 1906, page 31
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    • 31 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. service as clerks. For those who wish to become teachers in our Spanish possessions such a course will be very valuable. FRENCH. Mr. DuPoncet. French may be given for any who may wish...
    • 1907, page 33

    • 1907, page 33
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    • 33 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. FRENCH. MR. DU PONCET. Three years in French are offered. LATIN. MR. DU PONCET. Three years in Latin are given. MANUAL TRAINING. MR. WOODBURY. (1) This course is designed for students of...
    • Page 173

    • Page 173
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    • lights were out for a time and they were very happy to sit around in the dark and enjoy the inactivity.'" Many prominent citizens were on the subscription list for stock in the Dixie Power Co., in amounts varying from $100.00 to $1,000.00 or 10...
    • Page 37

    • Page 37
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    • U.S. Embassy 37 After World War II, the United States and its allies built a new world order. Today, it is up to the BRICs and the developed world to do it once again! \ What can be done to secure its position as the “best of the BRICs?” \...
    • Page 76

    • Page 76
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    • U.S. Embassy 76 Regionally, we appreciate the efforts that President Lula and other leaders made to bring about reconciliation with regard to the issues between Colombia and Ecuador. Brazil is working together with many countries in Africa to help...
    • Page 8

    • Page 8
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    • Emotions in Conflict 3 Because emotions and conflict are interdependent, it is believed that people avoid conflict in attempt to escape its accompanying emotions. Researchers Bodtker & Jameson (2001) believe that in order to manage conflict more...
    • Page 25

    • Page 25
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    • Emotions in Conflict 20 1990). When anger is the dominant emotion in conflict between individuals, the attitude towards each party and the conflict itself suffers. This attitude is actually in place before the conflict even begins. Unfortunately,...
    • Page 28

    • Page 28
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    • Emotions in Conflict 23 (Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2000). This has been viewed as beneficial because studying emotional intelligence captures a range of the abilities that includes perceiving emotion, facilitating thought with emotion,...
    • Page 31

    • Page 31
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    • Emotions in Conflict 26 negotiation process. Rather than trying to focus on each individual emotion that may come up in conflict situations, they put forth a different approach for using emotions. This new framework advises individuals engaging in...
    • Page 34

    • Page 34
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    • 30 motivation to read and have been shown to improve students’ reading levels and performance on tests. Book clubs can provide new exposures to reading opportunities that many students have not been exposed to in the past. Diversity is welcomed...
    • Page 43

    • Page 43
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    • Commitment 38 both the initial and focused coding process. Charmaz (2006) clarifies the importance of memo-writing when she said: Writing successive memos throughout the research process keeps you involved in the analysis and helps you to increase...
    • Page 48

    • Page 48
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    • STUDENT NEWSPAPER 49 May 10, 2013 To whom it may concern As requested, this is my letter of support for Sandra Cox. As a new faculty member and adviser for the student newspaper she has been a welcome addition to the faculty and to the...

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