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    • 1 4 4. What are some important points to remember about teaching spelling? The key points addressed are spelling must be taught, it must be individualized to meet the needs of the students and it must be taught across the curriculum. Teachers...
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    • 1 6 many forms of assessments with their program. There are diagnostic tests, formative and summative tests and measurements to allow for progress monitoring (Gentry, 2012). If mastery is not met, these tests inform the teacher of where re-teaching...
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    • 15 presented are phonemic awareness, phonics instruction, guided oral reading, comprehension strategies, fluency, vocabulary development, computer technology, and teacher training (National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, 2000). All...
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    • 16 technical electives and open university electives [Wes07]. Additionally, they suggested that each of the technical subjects must be accompanied 1 hour lab hours. The purpose of this lab course is to maintain hands-on experience among students...
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    • 17 similarly was sentence structure. In the framework of this study, this is not surprising; the hard rules of grammar are the same, regardless of culture or other human factors. AES System Perceptions In a study asking whether MyAccess! users...
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    • 2 the “greening” of schools to bring a natural environment to urban areas and supplement school meal plans with food grown on campus. Urban school gardens provided a valuable learning environment that was unusual in large cities. Rural schools...
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    • 21 Teachers face many barriers: time, accessibility of the parents, and the ineffective outcome of previous parent teacher encounters. However, there are valid reasons why parents slip in consistent communication with schools, and teachers. The...
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    • 23 Regardless of reports that homework may or may not increase academic achievement, elementary students are spending increasing amounts of time studying outside the classroom. In a longitudinal study from 1981 to 1997, Hofferth & Sandberg (2001)...
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    • 28 Educators have a huge effect on student motivation. Enthusiasm can help undo years and years of self-perceived failure. Demos and Foshay have reflected on the importance of the teacher’s role in modeling reading enthusiasm. Since disengagement...
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    • 3 9 teachers the data that was collected from using the Spelling Connections program, I would hope to convince them of the importance of taking the time to teach spelling. Tier 2 and Tier 3 students in the study, made huge gains and most are now...
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    • 31 The next question dealt specifically with the Spring Service Expedition. The students were asked to rate how influential each factor was for them with regard to the Expedition. Table 6 shows the results to their responses. Table 6 UVU Spring...
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    • 33 Data Results – Participant Survey In addition to tracking the number of students placed in the seclusion/skills classroom, the researcher also conducted a survey in order to gain feedback from the participants, teachers in this study (See...
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    • 33 materials for the garden including funding and space; (b) lack of time for staff, students, and faculty to properly implement school garden learning; and (c) lack of knowledge and curriculum. Overcoming these barriers has expanded the reach and...
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    • 35 were sent home in both Spanish and English. These data were then compared to the data from the parents whose students received SETHL books only in English. Qualitative methods used the ERAS assessment to measure change in the feelings of the...
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    • 36 sites? Here again, important factors for practical use is evident ranging from potential for impact, the type of project suited to the audience and match of skill with the project. The male participants tended to chose sites where they felt that...
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    • 38 Chapter 6 Implications The following specific recommendations were identified from the current study. The term educator in this chapter is used very loosely to include faculty, student life personnel and service center staff. Educators should...
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    • 39 The DIBELS scores of Spanish-speaking ESL kindergarten students in this class saw varying rates of success. All students who at mid-year were given the highest designation of At or Above Benchmark, or proficient readers for kindergarten level,...
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    • 48 CHAPTER 5 SUMMARY As discussed in the previous chapters, from this research, we managed to come up with a pattern on how digital forensics education should be established. The five components consist of general, basic foundation, forensics...
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    • 49 The Digital forensics component covers advanced computer science and information technology skills. Students would be able to use advanced digital forensics analysis tools to recover potential evidence from physical media storage that comes...
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    • 5 Chapter 2 Review of Literature Introduction The purpose of this literature review was to examine the history, review the types, discuss the benefits, and analyze the barriers to school gardens. Many important considerations were summarized from...

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