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  • All fields: communities
(162 results)



Display: 20

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    • 10 deprived of learning because of their social isolation and lack of interaction, which affected their overall cognitive functioning. As a result, Vygotsky set out to transform education in Russia by creating new pedagogical styles that would...
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    • 104 Internet advertising. The Internet is increasingly considered one of the most effective ways to advertise since the Internet has several advantages over the traditional forms of advertising in the travel and tourism industry, including...
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    • 11 Service learning helps promote both intellectual and civic engagement by linking the work students do in the classroom to real-world problems and real-world needs. Without compromising academic rigor or discipline-specific objectives, service...
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    • 13 community to display children’s work, bringing children’s artifacts from home to display at school, and sharing photographs outside the classroom (Feiler et al., 2008). In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Education’s (USDOE)...
    • Page 27

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    • 14 Chapter 1 The Internet and the Web References European Organization for Nuclear Research. (2008). How the web began. Retrieved on September 10, 2008, from http://public.web.cern.ch/Public/en/About/WebStory-en.html. Howe, W. (2007). An anecdotal...
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    • 14 the school by using funds from the Effective Teaching and Learning Literacy Program (USDOE, 2010a). These government programs are examples of how educators and scholars are redefining literacy as the term expands into the experiences and lives...
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    • 18 primary surveys were utilized to develop a survey that served as the instrument to test the research questions. Procedures This study followed a group of Spring Service Expedition participants. The criteria used to determine successful...
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    • 19 5. Collegiality and professionalism. (Korkmaz, 2007, p. 390). Furthermore, an effective school must be open to the ideas and feelings of teachers and students. Schools need to have in place an effective way of communicating with all employees,...
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    • 19 when they enter school compared to children from poor HLEs. However, those children from low-SES families and ethnic backgrounds had the most variability of literacy experiences in the home environment. “Relating these profiles to SES and...
    • Page 26

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    • 20 one in which parents may still value literacy and their children’s education; however, they are less educated and engage in fewer literacy activities in the home. Students from literacy-oriented communities have proven to be more prepared for...
    • Page 27

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    • 21 there is a possibility that someone else in the home is (Haneda, 2006). ELL out-of-school “literacy practices are typically bilingual or multilingual in nature” (Haneda, 2006, p. 339), as they are associated with religion and parental...
    • Page 28

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    • 22 students’ investment in school learning appears to increase” (Haneda, 2006, p. 343). ELLs can then feel safe to learn in this type of school environment as it allows them become active readers and writers when exposed to new texts. It is not...
    • Page 29

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    • 23 of the school, McLaughlin noticed that other Western-based institutions, such as the local Christian churches, provided religious reading material in Navajo and that Navajo literacy classes were established by members of the community. In terms...
    • Page 31

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    • 25 considered more popular modes of receiving printed messages. If educators understand this multimedia culture, and how students in the digital era interpret messages, they can use this knowledge to build on students’ current interests and...
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    • 26 contest. This study found that ninety-seven percent of the school gardens were used primarily for environmental education. Barriers to School Gardens Barriers to school gardens were obstacles that stood in the way, limited or slowed school...
    • Page 33

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    • 27 that curriculum standards are taught and students are prepared for end-of-level tests, such as the CRTs. However, if educators recognize that another priority of teaching should be to learn about the HLEs, home communities, and the cultural...
    • Page 34

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    • 28 Internet in the home or somewhere in their communities. Immigrant families and low-SES families might feel more of a need to own a computer rather than to have a television. There are many reasons for this, but it is obvious that these families...
    • Page 34

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    • 31 takes into consideration climate, weather, and water limitations for the area. These considerations have prolonged the life of a school garden. Planning with community involvement has reduced security concerns. If physical security was a threat...

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