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(199 results)



Display: 20

    • 1900-1901. Southern Branch of the State Normal School of the University of Utah. Cedar City.

    • Branch Normal School (Cedar City, Utah) -- History; Cedar City (Utah) -- History; Iron County (Utah) -- History; College Catalogs; Southern Utah University (Cedar City, Utah) -- Curricula;
    • Begins with photographs of students, classrooms, and buildings. Contains the calendar, board of regents, officers of the board, and officers and instructors. It also includes general information such as history, site and building, laboratories and...
    • 1899-1900. Southern Branch of the State Normal School of the University of Utah. Cedar City

    • Branch Normal School (Cedar City, Utah) -- History; Cedar City (Utah) -- History; College Catalogs; Iron County (Utah) -- History; Southern Utah University (Cedar City, Utah) -- Curricula;
    • Begins with photographs of students, classrooms, and buildings. Contains the calendar, board of regents, officers of the board, and officers and instructors. It also includes general information such as history, site and building, laboratories and...
    • Page 14

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    • 1 1 the newspaper ran the letters exactly as they had been written. It didn't take long to figure out why. For starters, the 25 students spelled "vandal" in nearly as many ways. "Dear Vandales" went one letter, "I really think that you were tuped...
    • Page 53

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    • 47 Stress is a part of every teacher’s life. The participants in this study identified many factors adding stress to their lives. One teacher mentioned the expectation to have all students reading on benchmark and the challenge of uncooperative...
    • Page 15

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    • 1 2 J. Richard Gentry, Ph.D., and author of many books based on spelling research, was asked by the Zaner-Bloser editor Marytherese Croakin to discuss the four most pressing questions teachers have asked about teaching spelling. Here are the...
    • Page 54

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    • 48 implement new programs every year. One teacher said her greatest barrier was there was not enough of her to go around to help all of the students all of the time. Table 5 represents teachers responses related to RTI’s effect on teaching. Table...
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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Context of the Problem English learners (ELs) are students who are learning English as a new language. This can be either as a second language or an additional language. They do so while living in the United States or other...
    • Page 57

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    • 51 would have the benefit of synergy as professionals collectively brainstorm and troubleshoot potential problems and their solutions. It is understandable to believe, “teachers who engage in collaborative efforts are more likely to see themselves...
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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 3 Some good examples of this are receiving and processing information from a tour guide, receiving directions to a location, and receiving oral instructions in meetings or classrooms (A. Azucena, personal...
    • Page 11

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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 4 written instructions and visual support, (d) orally with written instructions and vocabulary support, and (e) in Spanish with oral instructions only? 2. What is the relationship of the participating students’...
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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 5 Chapter 2 Literature Review When considering ways to help ELs reach higher levels of understanding and information processing during detailed oral instruction and problem solving in mathematics, a look at prior...
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    • 6 to take some of the grading burden, teachers could more easily “assign more writing, and so students could get the practice they needed to develop as writers—practice that was not possible in most classrooms because of the burden it placed on...
    • Page 10

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    • 7 writing must be significant. It must be significant enough to continue looking for other answers, or continue down the very troubling path of not assigning a sufficient amount of writing for student, thereby perpetuating the cycle of producing...
    • Page 18

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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 11 proficiency levels (on such tests as Utah Academic Language Proficiency Assessment), enabling them to follow instructions in English, they still appear to encounter problems that slow them down when processing...
    • Page 25

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 21 student learning outcomes. This is accomplished through on-going collaboration and professional learning focused on understanding how students learn. New practices are learned, created, and implemented...

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