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  • All fields: classrooms
(175 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 31

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    • 25 considered more popular modes of receiving printed messages. If educators understand this multimedia culture, and how students in the digital era interpret messages, they can use this knowledge to build on students’ current interests and...
    • Page 34

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    • 30 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING 1. Created and administered a questionnaire on inclusion in order to determine teachers’ understanding, application, and interests in learning more about inclusion. The information gathered from the questionnaire dro...
    • Page 35

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    • 31 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING perceived needs based on data collection from the questionnaires and observations. (September, 2011) 5. Evaluated effectiveness of the workshop in the form of a post-­‐training survey in order to determine effectiven...
    • Page 40

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    • fascinating that a lack of time and a lag of time between training and implementation both play a part in teachers feeling as if they need more training. When asked, “Would more instruction using iPads help you and/or your students use them more...
    • Page 43

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    • 39 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Chapter 5 Discussion As a result of this creative project, it was intended that teachers would effectively implement inclusion strategies in their classrooms, thereby improving academic and social success for student...
    • Page 44

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    • Another implication of this study is whether the cost of the iPad is outweighed by its benefits. Teachers surveyed did see benefits to the iPad, but is it worth it to spend the money when teachers are not being trained to use them effectively? This...
    • Page 46

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    • 42 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING available. Nor did it go into great detail of each different disability, or how to handle each student individually. It was a one-­‐time training that will not be offered again. The focus was only on mild/moderate st...
    • Page 48

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    • 44 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Chapter 6 Reflection As I reflected on this project, I realized it impacted the majority of the students and staff at Monroe Elementary School. I felt that this project was well received by all involved and will prod...
    • Page 49

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    • 45 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING willing to make the change to inclusion if they are given the necessary training to do so. I also learned that teachers haven’t been making the necessary accommodations for disabled students because they haven’t know...
    • Page 5

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    • 3 will be required. This stage would require written permission from the target student's parents in order to conduct an evaluation, which would determine whether or not the student has a conduct disorder qualifying him/her for special education...
    • Page 50

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    • 46 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING References Ammer, J.J. (1984). The mechanics of mainstreaming: considering the regular educators’ perspective. Remedial and Special Education, 5(6), 15-­‐20. Blenk, K., & Fine, D.L. (1995). Making school inclusion wo...
    • Page 51

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    • 47 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Pearpoint, J., & Forest, M. (n.d.). Inclusion: it’s about change! Retrieved from http://www.inclusion.com/inclusion.htlm. Pearson, M. (2006). Improving middle level inclusion. The Utah Special Educator, 26(4), 16-­‐1...
    • Page 11

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    • 8 When the student [understood] that the life of the plants that have been sown depend[ed] upon his care and in watering them … without which the little plant drie[d] up … the child [became] vigilant, as one who [was] beginning to feel a mission in...
    • Page 12

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    • 10 philosophy that educators can recognize signs that indicate a potential for inappropriate behavior (Murdick, 1996). It is preferable to prevent inappropriate behaviors rather than wait until after the behaviors occur before responding. Students...
    • Page 6

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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Professional development is an element of education with which teachers, counselors, and administrators become readily familiar and something of which they rarely encounter a scarcity. First year teachers not only enter their...
    • Page 44

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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 40 Pediatrics, 126(2), 298-305 Kawabata, Y., & Crick, N. (2011). The antecedents of friendship in moderately diverse classrooms; social preference, social impact, and social behavior. International Journal of...
    • Page 7

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    • 2 contrary—highly enthusiastic, yet fail to successfully incorporate new knowledge or skills into their curriculums. Background, Significance, Purpose and Study Setting As more and more districts, and most specifically teachers, feel the pressures...
    • Page 25

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    • 22 were sent home to needy families (Johnnston, 2001). The school community improved with school gardens as documented in a 2001 study by L. Thorp and C. Townsend. This study found that a school garden “reshaped school culture, creating hope,...
    • Page 113

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 106 this perception may maintain or increase student investment in the program at the school. Additionally, this perception demonstrated that TLIM program positively affected a mediating variable of academic...

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