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    • Page 48

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    • 44 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Chapter 6 Reflection As I reflected on this project, I realized it impacted the majority of the students and staff at Monroe Elementary School. I felt that this project was well received by all involved and will prod...
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    • 45 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING willing to make the change to inclusion if they are given the necessary training to do so. I also learned that teachers haven’t been making the necessary accommodations for disabled students because they haven’t know...
    • Page 5

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    • 3 will be required. This stage would require written permission from the target student's parents in order to conduct an evaluation, which would determine whether or not the student has a conduct disorder qualifying him/her for special education...
    • Page 50

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    • 46 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING References Ammer, J.J. (1984). The mechanics of mainstreaming: considering the regular educators’ perspective. Remedial and Special Education, 5(6), 15-­‐20. Blenk, K., & Fine, D.L. (1995). Making school inclusion wo...
    • Page 51

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    • 47 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Pearpoint, J., & Forest, M. (n.d.). Inclusion: it’s about change! Retrieved from http://www.inclusion.com/inclusion.htlm. Pearson, M. (2006). Improving middle level inclusion. The Utah Special Educator, 26(4), 16-­‐1...
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    • 8 When the student [understood] that the life of the plants that have been sown depend[ed] upon his care and in watering them … without which the little plant drie[d] up … the child [became] vigilant, as one who [was] beginning to feel a mission in...
    • Page 12

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    • 10 philosophy that educators can recognize signs that indicate a potential for inappropriate behavior (Murdick, 1996). It is preferable to prevent inappropriate behaviors rather than wait until after the behaviors occur before responding. Students...
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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Professional development is an element of education with which teachers, counselors, and administrators become readily familiar and something of which they rarely encounter a scarcity. First year teachers not only enter their...
    • Page 44

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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 40 Pediatrics, 126(2), 298-305 Kawabata, Y., & Crick, N. (2011). The antecedents of friendship in moderately diverse classrooms; social preference, social impact, and social behavior. International Journal of...
    • Page 7

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    • 2 contrary—highly enthusiastic, yet fail to successfully incorporate new knowledge or skills into their curriculums. Background, Significance, Purpose and Study Setting As more and more districts, and most specifically teachers, feel the pressures...
    • Page 62

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    • 58 References Bean, T. (1999). Intergenerational conversations and two adolescents’ multiple literacies: implications for redefining content area literacy. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 42(6), pp. 438-448. Beck, I., McKeown, M.,...
    • Page 25

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    • 22 were sent home to needy families (Johnnston, 2001). The school community improved with school gardens as documented in a 2001 study by L. Thorp and C. Townsend. This study found that a school garden “reshaped school culture, creating hope,...
    • Page 113

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 106 this perception may maintain or increase student investment in the program at the school. Additionally, this perception demonstrated that TLIM program positively affected a mediating variable of academic...
    • Page 61

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 62 Bass, M. (1960). Leadership, psychology and organizational behavior. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Beatty, M. (1988). Physiological assessment. In J.A. Daly & J.C. McCroskey (Eds.). Avoiding communication:...
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    • 15 teachers may obtain new ideas and skills but be unable to implement them in their particular context because of the specific characteristics or idiosyncrasies of their workplace” (p. 73 & 76). In examining different professional development...
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    • 16 lasting and effective. Time becomes one of the most important factors when evaluating organizational support; allowances and accommodations must be made to provide teachers appropriate time to utilize learned skills to their fullest potential...
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    • Self-Disclosure and Cohesion in the Classroom iii SELF-DISCLOSURE AND COHESION IN THE RELIDIOUS CLASSROOM Curt Ryan Wakefield Dr. Suzanne Larson, Thesis Supervisor ABSTRACT This research regards the relationship between self-disclosure and cohesion...
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    • 25 Anonymous student test scores are public information and were obtained from the Utah State Office of Education’s COGNOS site. Teacher’s individual identification numbers were released to the primary investigator on signed consent...

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