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  • All fields: classrooms
(175 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 14

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    • 1 1 the newspaper ran the letters exactly as they had been written. It didn't take long to figure out why. For starters, the 25 students spelled "vandal" in nearly as many ways. "Dear Vandales" went one letter, "I really think that you were tuped...
    • Page 53

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    • 47 Stress is a part of every teacher’s life. The participants in this study identified many factors adding stress to their lives. One teacher mentioned the expectation to have all students reading on benchmark and the challenge of uncooperative...
    • Page 15

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    • 1 2 J. Richard Gentry, Ph.D., and author of many books based on spelling research, was asked by the Zaner-Bloser editor Marytherese Croakin to discuss the four most pressing questions teachers have asked about teaching spelling. Here are the...
    • Page 54

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    • 48 implement new programs every year. One teacher said her greatest barrier was there was not enough of her to go around to help all of the students all of the time. Table 5 represents teachers responses related to RTI’s effect on teaching. Table...
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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Context of the Problem English learners (ELs) are students who are learning English as a new language. This can be either as a second language or an additional language. They do so while living in the United States or other...
    • Page 57

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    • 51 would have the benefit of synergy as professionals collectively brainstorm and troubleshoot potential problems and their solutions. It is understandable to believe, “teachers who engage in collaborative efforts are more likely to see themselves...
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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 3 Some good examples of this are receiving and processing information from a tour guide, receiving directions to a location, and receiving oral instructions in meetings or classrooms (A. Azucena, personal...
    • Page 11

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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 4 written instructions and visual support, (d) orally with written instructions and vocabulary support, and (e) in Spanish with oral instructions only? 2. What is the relationship of the participating students’...
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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 5 Chapter 2 Literature Review When considering ways to help ELs reach higher levels of understanding and information processing during detailed oral instruction and problem solving in mathematics, a look at prior...
    • Page 9

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    • 6 to take some of the grading burden, teachers could more easily “assign more writing, and so students could get the practice they needed to develop as writers—practice that was not possible in most classrooms because of the burden it placed on...
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    • 7 writing must be significant. It must be significant enough to continue looking for other answers, or continue down the very troubling path of not assigning a sufficient amount of writing for student, thereby perpetuating the cycle of producing...
    • Page 18

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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 11 proficiency levels (on such tests as Utah Academic Language Proficiency Assessment), enabling them to follow instructions in English, they still appear to encounter problems that slow them down when processing...
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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 21 student learning outcomes. This is accomplished through on-going collaboration and professional learning focused on understanding how students learn. New practices are learned, created, and implemented...
    • Page 9

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    • 4 sixth grade. The DIBELS assessment is given in K-6 classrooms three times per year. It is an individualized test with the proctor working one-on-one with students to assess their growth throughout the year (Good, R. H., & Kaminski, R. A.,...
    • Page 5

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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Nature of the problem There is a tremendous amount of pressure placed upon students and teachers to achieve proficient scores on end of level math testing. High expectations dealing with math have created many different...
    • Page 23

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    • EL INFORMATION PROCESSING IN MATH 16 learning the English language. Although ELs usually receive additional linguistic support in school, they continue to be the lowest achieving students on assessments. This fact emphasizes the importance of...
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    • 3 shown to help teachers rectify the lack of parental involvement in a student’s math education. Background, Significance, and Purpose Statement, and Study Setting There has been a large amount of research done studying the importance of parental...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 Burstein, 2006). Interestingly, despite the high correlation of AES to human scores, and the newer software, in 2006 the AWA switched to using IntelliMetric, a program developed by another company (Dikli, 2006; Grimes, Warschauer,...
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    • 5 Definition of terms Academic Achievement: Students being able to perform independently at grade level proficiency. Basic Skills Test: The Basic Skills Test is an assessment measuring a student’s understanding as it pertains to math fundamentals...

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