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  • All fields: classroom
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    • 30 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING 1. Created and administered a questionnaire on inclusion in order to determine teachers’ understanding, application, and interests in learning more about inclusion. The information gathered from the questionnaire dro...
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    • 104 Chapter 6 Animation with Photoshop References Abode Photoshop CS3: Classroom in a book. Adobe Press 2007. Oxford American Dictionary (1986). New York: Avalon Books Wikipedia Definitions. Retrieved on November 18, 2008, from...
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    • 74 Davis, B. H., Resta, V., Davis, L.L., & Camacho, A. (2001). Novice teachers learn about literature circles through collaborative action research. Journal of Reading Education, v 26 n3, 1-6. Demos, E.D., & Foshay, J.D., (2010). Engaging the...
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    • 31 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING perceived needs based on data collection from the questionnaires and observations. (September, 2011) 5. Evaluated effectiveness of the workshop in the form of a post-­‐training survey in order to determine effectiven...
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    • Figure 14: Frequency of Writing on iPads in Language Arts-Teachers Results: As illustrated in Figure 14, two of the responding teachers reported using iPads once a week, two reported using the iPad twice a week, one reported three times weekly and...
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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 18 In all the settings in which girls interact, one of the most dominant for the use of relational aggression, is the school arena. It is imperative that school officials intervene to stop aggressors because they...
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    • 27 that curriculum standards are taught and students are prepared for end-of-level tests, such as the CRTs. However, if educators recognize that another priority of teaching should be to learn about the HLEs, home communities, and the cultural...
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    • 32 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Evaluation The completed project was evaluated using both formative and summative evaluations. The formative evaluation included a questionnaire and observations. These allowed the researcher to collect data and dete...
    • Page 80

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    • 76 McRae, A., & Guthrie, J. T., (2009). Promoting reasons for reading: Teacher practices that impact motivation. Hiebert, E. H. (Ed.) (2009) Reading more, reading better. (p. 71) NY, NY: Guilford Press Mcpherson, K. (2007). Harry potter and the...
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    • 33 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING CHAPTER 4 Results The purpose of this project was to design, develop, and deliver an in-­‐school training presentation to the teaching staff at Monroe Elementary School in Sevier School District. In order to complete...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 75 “Please share any additional thoughts/comments about using the ‘Leader in Me’ program in your classroom/school.”—yielded responses from the teachers and the principal that, upon analysis, centered on specific...
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    • 29 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this research project was to investigate whether the connection between literacy achievement among English language learners (ELLs) from low socio-economic status (SES) families and their home-literacy...
    • Page 81

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    • 77 Schiefele, U., (1999). Interest and learning from text. Scientific Studies of Reading, 3, 257-279. Serafini, F. (2000). Before the conversations become “grand”. The California Reader, 33(3), 19-24 Stringer, S.A., Mollineaux, B. (2003) Removing...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 76 was outrageous.” Another concurred, “Training with Covey was extremely expensive and I’m not sure we couldn’t have done the same thing by reading the books!”1 Additionally, one adult complained about the...
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    • 35 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Regular Classroom Results Students were observed in their regular classroom setting in order for the researcher to see first-­‐hand if the child’s needs were being met, and also to determine what type of accommodatio...
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    • Figure 22: Students’ View on the Fun of Using the iPad versus Handwriting Results: As illustrated in Figure 22, 58% of responding students view writing on an iPad as more fun than handwriting. Conclusion. The data indicates that students do not...
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    • Emotions in Conflict 70 understood, the next step is to find merit in that perspective. Perhaps most important is the final step of communicating understanding through words and actions. The real-life application of showing appreciation is found in...
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    • 36 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Table 2 Regular Classroom Results Yes No % % Are accommodations being made? 37 63 Are students’ needs being met? 20 80 Are disabled students being included? 83 17 Note. Percentage data were rounded to the nearest...
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    • Chapter 5 Discussion The purpose of this study was to examine iPads and their effect on writing in the secondary classroom. The expected outcome of the research was to find that students preferred writing with an iPad because they are familiar with...

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