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  • All fields: classroom
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Display: 20

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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Disruptive student behavior in the classroom setting is a major area of concern in the field of education. Disruptive classroom behavior inhibits student learning and reduces cognitive engagement time by interrupting teacher...
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    • MINDSETS AND YOUNG STUDENTS 51 Jump rope Have students take turns picking an item out of the basket and discuss as a group its importance in maintaining a healthy brain. III. Assessment: Concept map. Give each student a piece of fruit along with a...
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    • 2 decisions in the regular classroom. Therefore, students who have been placed in the Pro-Active Skill Building Program will potentially be better apt to exhibit behaviors that are more acceptable, allowing them to experience success in the regular...
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    • MINDSETS AND YOUNG STUDENTS 52 Session Six Introduce growth and fixed mindset vocabulary Goal: Introduce the mindset vocabulary and recognize the fixed and growth mindset in a story. I. Review again all the ways the students have learned to make...
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    • 3 will be required. This stage would require written permission from the target student's parents in order to conduct an evaluation, which would determine whether or not the student has a conduct disorder qualifying him/her for special education...
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    • 46 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING References Ammer, J.J. (1984). The mechanics of mainstreaming: considering the regular educators’ perspective. Remedial and Special Education, 5(6), 15-­‐20. Blenk, K., & Fine, D.L. (1995). Making school inclusion wo...
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    • MINDSETS AND YOUNG STUDENTS 53 Dealing with frustration Goal: To help students understand that failing and getting frustrated are an important part of learning and learning how to persist. I. Discuss how frustration, hard work, worry, sadness, and...
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    • 4 Another purpose of this study was to better involve parents in the decision-making concerning discipline measures taken when assisting target students. Research has shown, “students whose parents are involved in their education often show...
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    • 47 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Pearpoint, J., & Forest, M. (n.d.). Inclusion: it’s about change! Retrieved from http://www.inclusion.com/inclusion.htlm. Pearson, M. (2006). Improving middle level inclusion. The Utah Special Educator, 26(4), 16-­‐1...
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    • MINDSETS AND YOUNG STUDENTS 54 Spend the session administering the assessments. Afterwards give each student a small eraser shaped like a brain. Discuss the importance of making mistakes and that through our mistakes is how we learn the most. The...
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    • 48 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Schwartz, I., Odom, S., & Sandall, S. (n.d). Including young children with special needs. Retrieved from http://www.newhorizons.org/spneeds/inclusion/ information/schwartz3.htm Seehorn, A. (n.d.). Barriers and benefi...
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    • 6 in the area of ESL. She has taught in the Iron County School District in the state of Utah for six years. Two of the years taught were in fourth grade and the remaining four have been in first grade. Definition of Terms The following are...
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    • 50 Important Findings The first findings that need to be discussed were those discovered at the parent training, for which there is no specific data, but rather feedback from parents given to the researcher. It was surprising to note that attending...
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    • 7 Chapter 2 Literature Review Introduction The primary goal of a teacher is to create and deliver meaningful instruction in order to help students acquire knowledge and skills related to academic content objectives. Disruptive classroom behavior...
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    • 50 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Appendix A Questionnaire What is your definition of inclusion? What are the advantages/disadvantages of inclusion? Do you feel that inclusion is working well in your class? Why or why not? Do you feel that...
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    • 73 and the bottom of the scale is equally important. All students are taken into consideration when decisions about activities are made and lessons developed. I did this research to become a better teacher. I believe the day a teacher stops...
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    • 8 and/or movements and gestures not coinciding with instructional activity (Fayne & Gettinger, 1982). Students exhibiting disruptive behaviors that occur frequently and are often intense in nature are of most concern. When a student’s disruptive...
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    • 9 concluded that 15% to 25% of class time is spent dealing with student behaviors, which are incompatible to desired academic and on-task behaviors (Matheson & Shriver, 2005). Other research findings have reported that as much as half of classroom...
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    • 52 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Appendix B Classroom Observation Form INCLUSION – CLASSROOM OBSERVATION FORM School: ________________ Grade: ____ Subject: _________ Teacher: __________ Date: _______ Period/Time: ________ General description of...

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