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  • All fields: classroom
(579 results)



Display: 20

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    • 1 2 J. Richard Gentry, Ph.D., and author of many books based on spelling research, was asked by the Zaner-Bloser editor Marytherese Croakin to discuss the four most pressing questions teachers have asked about teaching spelling. Here are the...
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    • 1 3 development of spelling content, and word study can effectively teach spelling in this manner. But, he warned about the different caveats that happen when teaching with this method. The first argument is that spelling is in theory “caught”...
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    • 1 4 4. What are some important points to remember about teaching spelling? The key points addressed are spelling must be taught, it must be individualized to meet the needs of the students and it must be taught across the curriculum. Teachers...
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    • 1 Best Spelling Practices in Classroom Instruction Chapter 1 - Introduction There are many challenges that face educators regarding how to effectively teach spelling. Gentry stated, “Spelling really does matter and that, as educators, we need to...
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    • 1 CHAPTER 1 Introduction -­‐ Nature of the Problem The connection between physical activity and student engagement is a heavily debated topic in the field of education. The health benefits of physical activity are well documented but the academic...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction- Nature of the Problem Every year students enter kindergarten with varying ability levels and with an array of educational backgrounds. While several students have attended a preschool or received some form of...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Nature of the problem There is a tremendous amount of pressure placed upon students and teachers to achieve proficient scores on end of level math testing. High expectations dealing with math have created many different...
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    • 1 ENGAGING SECONDARY STUDENTS IN MATHEMATICS WITH PROJECTS CREATED BY IMPLEMENTING HOWARD GARDNER’S MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES Chapter 1 Introduction In the last couple of decades emphasis has been placed on Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences....
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    • 1 Introduction In the religious classroom students interact with each other in a unique way that differs from that of a normal classroom experience. The nature of a religious course fosters an environment in which students have many opportunities...
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    • 10 2. activities that are impersonal and unrelated to the day-to-day problems of the participants; 3. professional development that has a district-wide focus and does not meet the needs of the individual schools and teachers (Smith & Kritsonis,...
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    • 10 deprived of learning because of their social isolation and lack of interaction, which affected their overall cognitive functioning. As a result, Vygotsky set out to transform education in Russia by creating new pedagogical styles that would...
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    • 10 discovered that the books may be for children on one level, but on other levels they speak to older students and adults” (Spicer, 2003, p. 5). According to Furner, Yahya, and Duffy (2005) there are benefits of using literature...
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    • 10 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING bus, or in a classroom. Students need to be integrated, or incorporated, within the regular classroom. Physical vicinity is not the only change spoken of here, but of social and academic integration as well. Partial...
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    • 10 philosophy that educators can recognize signs that indicate a potential for inappropriate behavior (Murdick, 1996). It is preferable to prevent inappropriate behaviors rather than wait until after the behaviors occur before responding. Students...
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    • 10 writing at this institution is not valued as human communication—and this in turn reduces the validity of the assessment (CCCC Executive Committee, 2004). They also have concerns with companies not communicating their algorithms with their...
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    • 103 Eighteen out of the twenty-two students used six of the learning styles. Musical/rhythmic learning style was not used in the presentation (see Figure 4.35). The final project given to the student was a scale drawing. Six students did not...
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    • 104 Chapter 6 Animation with Photoshop References Abode Photoshop CS3: Classroom in a book. Adobe Press 2007. Oxford American Dictionary (1986). New York: Avalon Books Wikipedia Definitions. Retrieved on November 18, 2008, from...
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    • 108 References Armstrong, T. (1994). Multiple intelligences in the classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum. Art & social studies in math class?. (2004, February). enc focus review, 7. Bazeli, M. (1997, January). Visual...
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    • 109 Gardner, H. (1991). The Unschooled mind. New York, NY: BasicBooks. Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences the theory in practice. New York, NY: BasicBooks. Honigsfeld, A., & Dunn R. (2009, May/June). Learning-Style responsive approaches...
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    • 11 In a research study conducted by O’Connor et al. (2000), a group of kindergarteners’ literacy progress was monitored and tracked over two years. During this time, students who were considered “at-risk” were given four tiers of...

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